droll

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French drôle ‎(comical, odd, funny), from drôle ‎(buffoon) from Middle French drolle ‎(a merry fellow, pleasant rascal) from Old French drolle ‎(one who lives luxuriously), from Middle Dutch drol ‎(fat little man, goblin) from Old Norse troll ‎(giant, troll) (compare Middle High German trolle ‎(clown)), from Proto-Germanic *truzlą ‎(creature which walks clumsily), from Proto-Germanic *truzlaną ‎(to walk with short steps). More at troll.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

droll ‎(comparative droller, superlative drollest)

  1. oddly humorous; whimsical, amusing in a quaint way; waggish

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

droll ‎(plural drolls)

  1. (archaic) A buffoon
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses, Episode 12, The Cyclops
      Our two inimitable drolls did a roaring trade with their broadsheets among lovers of the comedy element and nobody who has a corner in his heart for real Irish fun without vulgarity will grudge them their hardearned pennies.

Verb[edit]

droll ‎(third-person singular simple present drolls, present participle drolling, simple past and past participle drolled)

  1. (archaic) To joke, to jest.
    • 1886, Robert Louise Stevenson, Kidnapped
      "Eh, man," said I, drolling with him a little, "you're very ingenious! But would it not be simpler for you to write him a few words in black and white?

Anagrams[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

droll n ‎(genitive singular drolls, no plural)

  1. dawdling, loitering

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]