joke

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Joke

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Latin iocus (joke, jest, pastime), from Proto-Italic *jokos (word, (playful?) saying), from Proto-Indo-European *yokos (word, utterance), from ultimate root Proto-Indo-European *yek- (to speak, utter) (of which distant cognates include Proto-Celtic *yextis (language) (Breton yezh (language) and Welsh iaith (language)) and German Beichte (confession)). Cognate with French jouer, Italian giocare, Portuguese jogar, Spanish juego and jugar, Romanian juca, English Yule, Danish Jule, Norwegian Bokmål Jul, Swedish Jul, and Norwegian Nynorsk jol.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dʒəʊk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /dʒoʊk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊk

Noun[edit]

joke (plural jokes)

  1. An amusing story.
    • 1708, John Gay, Wine
      Or witty joke our airy senses moves / To pleasant laughter.
  2. Something said or done for amusement, not in seriousness.
    It was a joke!
    • 1733-1738, Alexander Pope, Imitations of Horace:
      Enclose whole downs in walls, 'tis all a joke.
  3. (figuratively) The root cause or main issue, especially an unexpected one
  4. (figuratively) A laughably worthless thing or person; a sham.
    Your effort at cleaning your room is a joke.
    The president was a joke.
  5. (figuratively) Something that is far easier or far less challenging than expected.
    The final exam was a joke.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Adjectives often applied to "joke": old, bad, inside, poor, silly, funny, lame, hilarious, stupid, offensive.

Synonyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Danish: joke
  • French: joke
  • Persian: جوک
  • Japanese: ジョーク, Japanese: 冗句
  • Welsh: jôc

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

joke (third-person singular simple present jokes, present participle joking, simple past and past participle joked)

  1. (intransitive) To do or say something for amusement rather than seriously.
    I didn’t mean what I said — I was only joking.
  2. (intransitive, followed by with) To dupe in a friendly manner for amusement; to mess with, play with.
    Relax, man, I'm just joking with you.
  3. (transitive, dated) To make merry with; to make jokes upon; to rally.
    to joke a comrade

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English joke.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

joke c (singular definite joken, plural indefinite jokes)

  1. joke
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English joke.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈd̥jɔwɡ̊ə], (imperative) IPA(key): [ˈd̥jɔwˀɡ̊]

Verb[edit]

joke (past tense jokede, past participle joket)

  1. joke
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English joke.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

joke f (plural jokes)

  1. (Louisiana, Quebec) joke
    • 2009, Robert Maltais, Le Curé du Mile End, page 195:
      Non, non, c'est juste une joke. Garde-lé, ton vingt piastres.
      No, no, that was a joke. Keep it, your twenty bucks.

Derived terms[edit]