sham

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See also: Sham

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Probably a dialectal form of shame.

Adjective

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sham

  1. Intended to deceive; false.
    It was only a sham wedding: they didn't care much for one another, but wanted their parents to stop hassling them.
  2. Counterfeit; unreal.
    • 1848 November – 1850 December, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 64, in The History of Pendennis. [], volumes (please specify |volume=I or II), London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1849–1850, →OCLC:
      For this young lady was not able to carry out any emotion to the full; but had a sham enthusiasm, a sham hatred, a sham love, a sham taste, a sham grief, each of which flared and shone very vehemently for an instant, but subsided and gave place to the next sham emotion.
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett, transl., Thucydides, Oxford: Clarendon Press, VIII.64, p. 592:
      For the subject-cities, having secured a moderate form of government, and having no fear of being called to account for their proceedings, aimed at absolute freedom; they scorned the sham independence proffered to them by the Athenians.
    • 2024 May 23, Sam Jones, “Spanish police recover Francis Bacon painting worth €5m”, in The Guardian[1], →ISSN:
      But the artist [...] is equally famous for his drinking, gambling, his turbulent relationships, his famously chaotic studio, and for the mordant toast frequently attributed to him: “Champagne for my real friends, real pain for my sham friends.”
Synonyms
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Antonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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Noun

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sham (countable and uncountable, plural shams)

  1. A fake; an imitation that purports to be genuine.
    The time-share deal was a sham.
  2. Trickery, hoaxing.
    A con-man must be skilled in the arts of sham and deceit.
  3. A false front, or removable ornamental covering.
  4. A decorative cover for a pillow.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Verb

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sham (third-person singular simple present shams, present participle shamming, simple past and past participle shammed)

  1. To deceive, cheat, lie.
  2. To obtrude by fraud or imposition.
  3. To assume the manner and character of; to imitate; to ape; to feign.
Translations
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Etymology 2

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Noun

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sham (uncountable)

  1. (slang) Clipping of champagne.
    • 1840, M. A. Titmarsh [pseudonym; William Makepeace Thackeray], The Paris Sketch Book, volumes (please specify |volume=I or II), London: John Macrone, [], →OCLC:
      So I orders a bottle, as if for myself; and, ‘Ma’am,’ says I, ‘will you take a glass of Sham—just one?’

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Karakalpak

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Etymology

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From Arabic شمع.

Noun

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sham

  1. candle

Uzbek

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Other scripts
Cyrillic шам (sham)
Latin sham
Perso-Arabic

Etymology

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Borrowed from Arabic شمع.

Noun

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sham (plural shamlar)

  1. candle

Declension

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