tromper

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French tromper, from Old French tromper (to tramp, trump, delude, literally to play on the trumpet), from trompe (trump, trumpet), from Frankish *trumpa (trump, trumpet), from a common Germanic word akin to Old High German trumba, trumpa (trump, trumpet), ultimately imitative.

More at tramp, tromp, trump.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tʁɔ̃.pe/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: trom‧per

Verb[edit]

tromper

  1. (transitive) to deceive, lead astray, mislead
  2. (transitive) to trick, dupe
  3. (transitive) to cheat on one's significant other
  4. (transitive) to distract oneself from
  5. (reflexive) to make a mistake
    New York est la capitale des États-Unis. Ah non, je me trompe, c'est Washington.
    New York is the capital of the United states. Wait, I'm wrong, it's Washington.
  6. (reflexive, with de) to mix up
    On est en retard parce qu'on s'est trompé de route, mais on ne s'est rendu compte qu'après une demie heure.
    We're late because we took the wrong road, and we only realized after half an hour.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

tromper

  1. Alternative form of trompour

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tromper (to tramp, trump, delude, literally to play on the trumpet), from trompe (trump, trumpet), from Frankish *trumpa (trump, trumpet), from a common Germanic word akin to Old High German trumba, trumpa (trump, trumpet), ultimately imitative.

Verb[edit]

tromper

  1. to trick; to deceive

Conjugation[edit]

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants[edit]

  • French: tromper