mop

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Mop, MOP, мор, and мөр

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English mappe (also as mappel), perhaps borrowed from Walloon mappe (napkin), from Latin mappa (napkin, cloth). Believed to be from a Semitic source, variously claimed as Phoenician or Punic (the latter by Quintilian). Compare Modern Hebrew מפה(mapá, a map; a cloth) (shortened from מנָפָה(manpah, fluttering banner, streaming cloth)). More at map.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mop (plural mops)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. An implement for washing floors or similar, made of a piece of cloth, or a collection of thrums, or coarse yarn, fastened to a handle.
  2. A wash with a mop; the act of mopping.
    He gave the floor a quick mop to soak up the spilt juice.
  3. (humorous) A dense head of hair.
    He ran a comb through his mop and hurried out the door.
  4. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) A fair where servants are hired.
  5. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) The young of any animal.
  6. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) A young girl; a moppet.
  7. A made-up face; a grimace.
  8. (African-American Vernacular, MLE, slang) A firearm particularly if it has a large magazine (compare broom, but still can be related to MP)
    • 2021 April 7, M24 (lyrics and music), “Plugged In”‎[1], 2:16–2:19:
      Mainstream in this ting but I'm fully on opps
      Got shot with a mop but that boy never dropped
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:firearm

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • German: Mopp

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mop (third-person singular simple present mops, present participle mopping, simple past and past participle mopped)

  1. (transitive) To rub, scrub, clean or wipe with a mop, or as if with a mop.
    to mop (or scrub) a floor
    to mop one's face with a handkerchief
  2. (intransitive) To make a wry expression with the mouth.
  3. (US, slang) To shoplift.
    • 2013, Martha Gever, ‎Pratibha Parmar, ‎John Greyson, Queer Looks (page 111)
      By “mopping” (stealing) the clothes and accessories necessary to effect their look, or by buying breasts, reconstructed noses, lifted chins, and female genitals, the children turn traditional ideas of labor around: []

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • (fair where servants are hired): 1873, John Camden Hotten, The Slang Dictionary

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

The now-obsolete sense brick, attested from the 17th century, appears to be the oldest, with the sense cookie following in the 18th century. The exact relationship between the various later senses is unclear. The ultimate origin is unclear, but possibly corrupted from mok (mug, cup).[1]

Noun[edit]

mop m (plural moppen, diminutive mopje n)

  1. a joke, jest
  2. a tune, melody
  3. a type of cookie
  4. (endearing, often in the diminutive) a woman or girl
  5. (obsolete) a brick
Usage notes[edit]
  • The use as an affectionate term of address is often as a diminutive, and specifically in the non-standard form moppie. The standard diminutive mopje is never used for this sense.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010), “mop2”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English mop.

Noun[edit]

mop m (plural mops, diminutive mopje n)

  1. a mop (an implement for washing floors, etc.)
    Synonym: zwabber, dekzwabber
Descendants[edit]
  • Papiamentu: mòp

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

mop

  1. first-person singular present indicative of moppen
  2. imperative of moppen

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From English mop.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mop m inan

  1. mop (implement for washing floors)
    Hypernym: szczotka

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mop in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • mop in Polish dictionaries at PWN