felt

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See also: Felt, FELT, and félt

English[edit]

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Felt cloths.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɛlt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English felt, from Old English felt, from Proto-West Germanic *felt (compare Dutch vilt, German Filz, Danish filt, French feutre), from Proto-Indo-European *pilto, *pilso 'felt' (compare Latin pilleus (felt) (adj.), Old Church Slavonic плъсть (plŭstĭ), Albanian plis, Ancient Greek πῖλος (pîlos)), from *pel- 'to beat'. More at anvil.

Noun[edit]

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felt (countable and uncountable, plural felts)

  1. A cloth or stuff made of matted fibres of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.
  2. A hat made of felt.
  3. (obsolete) A skin or hide; a fell; a pelt.
    • 1707, John Mortimer, The whole art of husbandry:
      To know whether sheep are sound or not, see that the felt be loose.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

felt (third-person singular simple present felts, present participle felting, simple past and past participle felted)

  1. (transitive) To make into felt, or a feltlike substance; to cause to adhere and mat together.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir M. Hale to this entry?)
  2. (transitive) To cover with, or as if with, felt.
    to felt the cylinder of a steam engine
  3. (transitive, poker) To cause a player to lose all their chips.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Old English fēled, corresponding to feel +‎ -ed.

Verb[edit]

felt

  1. simple past tense and past participle of feel

Adjective[edit]

felt (comparative more felt, superlative most felt)

  1. That has been experienced or perceived.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 257:
      Conversions to Islam can therefore be a deeply felt aesthetic experience that rarely occurs in Christian accounts of conversion, which are generally the source rather than the result of a Christian experience of beauty.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German velt, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (flat).

Gender changed by influence from mark.

Noun[edit]

felt c (singular definite felten, not used in plural form)

  1. field (the practical part of something)
  2. (e.g., sciences, military) field; an outlying area, as opposed to e.g. the lab, office or barracks
    • 2017, Palle Lauring, Svenskekrige og enevoldsmagt, Gyldendal A/S (→ISBN)
      Han oplevede hele Tredveårskrigen i felten, fra først til sidst.
      He experienced all of the thirty-years war in the field, from the beginning to the end.
    • 1913, Anno 13 [i.e. tretten]: Tysklands rejsning mod Napoleon for 100 år siden
      Han var rykket i Felten som Kaptain og Kompagnifører, men var dog nu blevet forfremmet til Major, ...
      He had deployed as a captain and a company-leader, but had now been promoted to major, ...
    • 1986, Johannes Møllehave, Vor tids tid: nutidige og utidige tids- og tankespring
      Efter anden verdenskrig skrev Theodor W. Adorno: »Bemærkede man da ikke ved krigsslutningen, at folk kom stumme tilbage fra felten?
    • 2012, Daniel Silva, Portræt af en spion: En Gabriel Allon-roman, Rosinante & Co (→ISBN)
      Han overvågede Sovjetunionens sammenbrud, ikke ude fra felten, men fra et komfortabelt kontor i Langley, ...
      He surveyed the collapse of the Soviet Union, not from the field, but from a comfortable office in Langley, ...
    • 1918, Georg Friedrich Nicolai, Krigens Biologi
      ... Officerer og Mandskab, som vendte hjem fra Felten, ...
    • 1986, Grønland: årsberetning
      I felten blev der ikke observeret nogen torske larver i prøverne, ...
      In the field, no cod larvae were observed in the samples, ...
    • 1993, Danmarks geologiske undersøgelse, Årsberetning for ... ; Arbejdsprogram ...
      En af instituttets vigtigste opgaver i forbindelse med geologiske undersøgelser er dataindsamling i felten.
      One of the institute's most important tasks relating to the geological surveys is data collection in the field.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German Feld, from Old High German feld, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (flat).

Noun[edit]

felt n (singular definite feltet, plural indefinite felter)

  1. field
  2. sphere, province
  3. square
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English felt, from Proto-West Germanic *felt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

felt (plural feltes)

  1. Felted fabric or a sample or swab of it; felt.
  2. A piece of headgear made from felted fabric; a felt hat.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: felt
  • Scots: felt

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From German Feld

Noun[edit]

felt n (definite singular feltet, indefinite plural felt or felter, definite plural felta or feltene)

  1. field
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German velt

Noun[edit]

felt m (definite singular felten, uncountable)

  1. field (in the military sense)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

felt

  1. past participle of felle

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From German Feld

Noun[edit]

felt n (definite singular feltet, indefinite plural felt, definite plural felta)

  1. field
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German velt

Noun[edit]

felt m (definite singular felten, uncountable)

  1. field (in the military sense)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

felt

  1. past participle of fella

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *felþą.

Noun[edit]

felt n

  1. field

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • felt”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *felt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

felt m

  1. felt

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

felt n

  1. (neuter, impersonal, as an adverb) urgent, necessary, pressing, important
    Fäll var ä felt
    Certainly it was necessary.
    Hä jär int na felt om hä
    There is no hurry therewith.