vill

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See also: Vill.

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman vill, from Old French vile (farm, country estate) (French ville (town)), from Latin vīlla. Doublet of villa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -ɪl
  • IPA(key): /vɪl/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

vill (plural vills)

  1. (historical) The smallest administrative unit of land in feudal England, corresponding to the Anglo-Saxon tithing and the modern parish.
  2. (obsolete) A villa; a country residence.
    • 1781, Richard Burn, Ecclesiastical Law, volume 1, page 61:
      Sometimes the kings in their country vills and seats of pleasure or retirement built a place of worship, which was the origin of royal free chapels.

Etymology 2[edit]

From will.

Verb[edit]

vill

  1. Pronunciation spelling of will.
    • 2011, Roberta C. M. DeCaprio, chapter 9, in A Rose in Amber, Wild Rose Press, →ISBN:
      “My calculations predict another day or so. Ve vill be docking in Liverpool.”
Usage notes[edit]
  • Imitating certain accents, such as German.

Central Franconian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German filu, from Proto-Germanic *felu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vill (irregular declension, comparative mieh, superlative et mietste or mieste or mieschte or määste or määschte)

  1. much; many

Usage notes[edit]

  • The adjective is declined regularly after an article or determiner, otherwise it is uninflected.
  • The superlative forms et mie(t)ste, mieschte are Ripuarian, the forms et määste, määschte are Moselle Franconian.

Estonian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *villa, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wĺ̥h₁neh₂ via Baltic.

Noun[edit]

vill (genitive villa, partitive villa)

  1. wool
Declension[edit]
Declension of vill (ÕS type 22u/leib, length gradation)
singular plural
nominative vill villad
accusative nom.
gen. villa
genitive villade
partitive villa villu
villasid
illative villa
villasse
villadesse
villusse
inessive villas villades
villus
elative villast villadest
villust
allative villale villadele
villule
adessive villal villadel
villul
ablative villalt villadelt
villult
translative villaks villadeks
villuks
terminative villani villadeni
essive villana villadena
abessive villata villadeta
comitative villaga villadega

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German swil (blister), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *swellaną (to swell).

Noun[edit]

vill (genitive villi, partitive villi)

  1. blister, boil
Declension[edit]
Declension of vill (ÕS type 22e/riik, length gradation)
singular plural
nominative vill villid
accusative nom.
gen. villi
genitive villide
partitive villi ville
villisid
illative villi
villisse
villidesse
villesse
inessive villis villides
villes
elative villist villidest
villest
allative villile villidele
villele
adessive villil villidel
villel
ablative villilt villidelt
villelt
translative villiks villideks
villeks
terminative villini villideni
essive villina villidena
abessive villita villideta
comitative villiga villidega

Further reading[edit]

  • M. Langemets, M. Tiits, T. Valdre, L. Veskis, Ü. Viks, P. Voll, editors (2009), “vill”, in [EKSS] Eesti keele seletav sõnaraamat [Descriptive Dictionary of the Estonian Language]‎[1] (online dictionary, in Estonian), 2nd edition, Tallinn: Eesti Keele Sihtasutus (Estonian Language Foundation)

References[edit]

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German filu, from Proto-Germanic *felu. Cognate with German viel, Dutch veel, English fele.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vill (masculine vill or villen, neuter vill or villt, comparative méi, superlative am meeschten)

  1. much, many
    En huet vill Frënn.
    He has many friends.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The positive forms are declined regularly after an article or determiner, otherwise they remain uninflected.
  • The comparative form is indeclinable and cannot be preceded by articles or determiners.
  • The superlative forms are declined in the normal way.

Adverb[edit]

vill

  1. much, a lot
    Dat Hiem ass vill ze kleng.
    That shirt is much too small.

Manx[edit]

Verb[edit]

vill

  1. past of mill

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse villr, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz. Cognates include English wild.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vill (neuter singular vilt, definite singular and plural ville, comparative villere, indefinite superlative villest, definite superlative villeste)

  1. wild

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse villr, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz. Cognates include English wild.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vill (neuter singular vilt, definite singular and plural ville, comparative villare, indefinite superlative villast, definite superlative villaste)

  1. wild

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

vill m or f

  1. rare form of ville

Old Norse[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vill

  1. strong feminine nominative singular of villr
  2. strong neuter nominative plural of villr
  3. strong neuter accusative plural of villr

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse villr, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz. Doublet of vild (wild), which is influenced from Middle Low German.

Adjective[edit]

vill

  1. (dated) lost (not knowing place or directions)
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

vill

  1. present indicative of vilja

References[edit]

  • vill in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)

Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *villa, a loan from Proto-Baltic *wilˀnāˀ. Cognates include Finnish villa.

Noun[edit]

vill

  1. wool

Declension[edit]

Inflection of vill (inflection type 5/sana)
nominative sing. vill
genitive sing. villan
partitive sing. villad
partitive plur. villoid
singular plural
nominative vill villad
accusative villan villad
genitive villan villoiden
partitive villad villoid
essive-instructive villan villoin
translative villaks villoikš
inessive villas villoiš
elative villaspäi villoišpäi
illative villaha
villha
villoihe
adessive villal villoil
ablative villalpäi villoilpäi
allative villale villoile
abessive villata villoita
comitative villanke villoidenke
prolative villadme villoidme
approximative I villanno villoidenno
approximative II villannoks villoidennoks
egressive villannopäi villoidennopäi
terminative I villahasai
villhasai
villoihesai
terminative II villalesai villoilesai
terminative III villassai
additive I villahapäi
villhapäi
villoihepäi
additive II villalepäi villoilepäi

Yola[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fillen, from Old English fyllan, from Proto-West Germanic *fullijan.

Verb[edit]

vill (simple past felt, past participle ee-vilt or ee-felt)

  1. to fill
    • 1867, “VERSES IN ANSWER TO THE WEDDEEN O BALLYMORE”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 3, pages 100[1]:
      At ye mye ne'er be wooveless ta vill a lear jock an cooan.
      That you may never be unprovided to fill an empty jack and can.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English fille, from Old English fyllu, from Proto-West Germanic *fullī.

Noun[edit]

vill [1]

  1. fill
    • 1867, “ABOUT AN OLD SOW GOING TO BE KILLED”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 1, pages 106[1]:
      At skelpearès an slaugheardhès mye leeigh aar oer vill.
      That the piglings and pigs may laugh their overfill.
    • 1927, “ZONG O DHREE YOLA MYTHENS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 131, lines 18[2]:
      An thaar zit down an yux our vill,
      And there sit down and sob our fill,

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 75
  2. ^ Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland