banc

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old French banc. Doublet of bank.

Noun[edit]

banc (plural bancs)

  1. A bench; a high seat, or seat of distinction or judgment.
  2. A tribunal or court.
    • 1822, House of Lords, The Sessional Papers 1801-1833 (volume 137, page 91)
      all the banc business of each county must be done in that county
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Respelling of bank.

Noun[edit]

banc (plural bancs)

  1. (US, business) Used to associate a non-banking affiliate of a bank with the bank's brand name without using the word bank

Further reading[edit]

  • banc at OneLook Dictionary Search

References[edit]

  • Texas Finance Code [1]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Germanic origin, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *bankiz (bench).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

banc m (plural bancs)

  1. bench
  2. bank (for money)
  3. bank (geographical feature)
  4. shoal (of fish)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German banc, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz (bench). Doublet of banque.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɑ̃/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

banc m (plural bancs)

  1. bench (seat)
  2. bank (mass of material, of cloud, fog, etc)
  3. bank, shoal, school (of fish)

Descendants[edit]

  • Breton: bank
  • English: banc
  • Romanian: bancă
  • Turkish: banc

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Middle English banke, from Middle French banque, from Old Italian banca (counter, moneychanger's bench or table), from Lombardic bank (bench, counter), from Proto-Germanic *bankiz (bench, counter), from Proto-Indo-European *bheg- (to turn, curve, bend, bow).

Noun[edit]

banc m (genitive singular bainc, nominative plural bainc or bancanna)

  1. (banking, etc.) bank (financial institution; branch of such an institution; safe and guaranteed place of storage)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Middle English banke, from Old English banc (bank, hillock, embankment), from Proto-Germanic *bankô.

Noun[edit]

banc m (genitive singular bainc, nominative plural bainc or bancanna)

  1. (geography) bank (of a river or lake)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
  • bancán m ((small) bank) (of earth)

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
banc bhanc mbanc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "banc" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “banc” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “banc” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *bank, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz.

Noun[edit]

banc f or m

  1. bench, seat
  2. judicial bench

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: bank (see there for further descendants)
  • Limburgish: bank

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

banc m (plural bancs)

  1. (Jersey) seat, bench
  2. (Jersey, nautical) thwart

Derived terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bank.[1]

Noun[edit]

banc m (plural banciau)

  1. bank (financial institution)

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Middle English banke.[1]

Noun[edit]

banc m (plural banciau)

  1. rising ground, hill, slope
  2. bank (in a sea or river, e.g. sandbank, mudbank)
  3. bank (of a river or lake)
    Synonym: glan

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
banc fanc manc unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “banc”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies