pang

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: pāng, páng, pǎng, and pàng

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Origin uncertain;[1] possibly from Middle English *pange, perhaps an altered form of prange, prōnge (affliction, agony, pain; pointed instrument) as in prongys of deth (“pangs of death, death throes”), from Latin pronga; compare Middle Dutch prange, pranghe (instrument for pinching) (modern Dutch prang (horse restraint; fetter, neck iron)), Middle Low German prange (pole, stake; (possibly) kind of pillory or stocks),[1][2][3] Old English pyngan (to prick). The word may thus be related to prong.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pang (plural pangs)

  1. Often in plural: a paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; a feeling of sudden and transitory agony; a throe.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iii], page 137, column 1:
      War[wick]. See how the pangs of death do make him grin. / Sal[isbury]. Diſturbe him not, let him paſſe peaceably.
    • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Night, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iv], page 269:
      He is knight dubb'd with vnhatche'd Rapier, and on carpet conſideration, but he is a diuell in priuate brall, soules and bodies hath he diuorc'd three, and his incenſement at this moment is ſo implacable, that ſatisfaction can be none, but by pangs of death and ſepulcher: Hob, nob, is his word: giu't or take't.
    • a. 1722, Matthew Prior, “Written in Lady Howe’s Ovid’s Epistles”, in The Poetical Works of Matthew Prior, Esq. [], Edinburgh: Printed by Mundell and Son, [], published 1793, OCLC 931361946; republished in Robert Anderson, editor, The Works of the British Poets. [], volume VII, London: Printed for John & Arthur Arch; and for Bell & Bradfute, and J. Mundell & Co. Edinburgh, 1795, OCLC 221535929, page 456, column 1:
      But, oh! what pangs torment the deſtin’d heart, / That feels the wound, yet dare not ſhow the dart; / What eaſe could Ovid to his ſorrows give, / Who muſt not ſpeak, and therefore cannot live?
    • 1888 May, Oscar Wilde, “The Nightingale and the Rose”, in The Happy Prince and Other Tales, London: David Nutt, [], OCLC 595167, pages 37–38:
      So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her. Bitter, bitter was the pain, and wilder and wilder grew her song, for she sang of the Love that is perfected by Death, of the Love that dies not in the tomb.
  2. Often in plural: a sudden sharp feeling of an emotional or mental nature, as of joy or sorrow.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pang (third-person singular simple present pangs, present participle panging, simple past and past participle panged)

  1. (transitive) To cause to have great pain or suffering; to torment, to torture.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 pang, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2005.
  2. ^ prong, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2007.
  3. ^ prōnge, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 3 December 2018.

Further reading[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

pang (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. bucket

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Synonyms[edit]


Javanese[edit]

Noun[edit]

pang

  1. branch

Ludian[edit]

Noun[edit]

pang

  1. handle

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

pang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of pāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of páng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of pǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of pàng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Puter) paun
  • (Sutsilvan) pàn
  • (Vallader) pan

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pānis, pānem.

Noun[edit]

pang m

  1. (Surmiran) bread

Noun[edit]

pang m (plural pangs)

  1. (Surmiran) loaf of bread

Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Interjection[edit]

pang

  1. bang (verbal percussive sound)

Noun[edit]

pang n

  1. bang, explosion
    • 1887, August Strindberg, Hemsöborna
      när plötsligen det hördes ett pang! utanför på gården och rasslet av glasskärvor.
      when suddenly they heard a bang! outside in the yard and the sound of broken glass.
    Han vaknade med ett pang.
    He woke up with a bang.
  2. (colloquial, dated) pension house, hotel; Contraction of pensionat.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The Swedish translation of John Cleese's Fawlty Towers (1975), "Pang i bygget" (1979) is a pun based on both definitions.

Declension[edit]

Declension of pang 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pang panget pang pangen
Genitive pangs pangets pangs pangens

Tagalog[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /paŋ/

Prefix[edit]

pang

  1. Adjective prefix - an action or a practice associated with the thing or action expressed by the root
    pang- + babae (woman)=pang-babae (for women only)
    Damit pang-babae
    Women's clothes
  2. instrumentative case of the noun - a tool or an instrument that is used to perform the action expressed by the root
    pang-+takip (a cover)=pangtakip (an instrument used to cover something)
  3. instrumentative case of the noun - native speakers sometimes use the prefix pan- instead of pang- without any change in the meaning of the word
    pan-+takip (a cover)=pantakip (an instrument used to cover something)

Veps[edit]

Noun[edit]

pang

  1. handle