dependent

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See also: dépendent and dependënt

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Originally dependant, from French dépendant, present participle of dépendre (to depend) (in English assimilated to Latin dēpendēns).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈpɛndənt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: de‧pend‧ent

Adjective[edit]

dependent (comparative more dependent, superlative most dependent)

  1. Relying upon; depending upon.
    • 2013 June 7, Joseph Stiglitz, “Globalisation is about taxes too”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 19:
      It is time the international community faced the reality: we have an unmanageable, unfair, distortionary global tax regime. […] It is the starving of the public sector which has been pivotal in America no longer being the land of opportunity – with a child's life prospects more dependent on the income and education of its parents than in other advanced countries.
    At that point I was dependent on financial aid for my tuition.
  2. (statistics) Having a probability that is affected by the outcome of a separate event.
    • 1994, Kathryn Stout, Maximum Math, page 217:
      The formula for finding the probablity of one event followed by a dependent event is written P(A, B) = P(A) × P(B/A) where P(B/A) is read “the probability of B given A.”
    • 2005, Alejandro Balbás, Rosario Romera, Esther Ruiz, Recent Advances in Applied Probability, Springer, page 49:
      Within the GMM framework, the distribution of returns conditional on the market return can be both serially dependent and conditionally heteroscedastic.
    • 2006, M.M. Rao and Randall J. Swift, Probability Theory with Applications (Second Edition), Springer, page 87:
      Is it possible to find events A, B of Ω so that A and B are independent? The answer to this simple and interesting problem is no. A probability space (Ω,Σ,P) is called a “dependent probability space” if there are no nontrivial independent events in Ω, (Ω,Σ,P) is called an independent space otherwise.
  3. (of Scottish Gaelic, Manx and Irish verb forms) Used in questions, negative sentences and after certain particles and prepositions.
  4. (medicine) Affecting the lower part of the body, such as the legs while standing up, or the back while supine.
  5. Hanging down.
    a dependent bough or leaf

Antonyms[edit]

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Hyponyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

dependent (plural dependents)

  1. (US) One who relies on another for support
    With two children and an ailing mother, she had three dependents in all.
  2. (grammar) An element in phrase or clause structure that is not the head. Includes complements, modifiers and determiners.
  3. (grammar) The aorist subjunctive or subjunctive perfective: a form of a verb not used independently but preceded by a particle to form the negative or a tense form. Found in Greek and in the Gaelic languages.

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Catalan[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dependent (masculine and feminine plural dependents)

  1. dependent

Ladin[edit]

Noun[edit]

dependent m (plural dependenc)

  1. employee

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dēpendent

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of dēpendeō

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French dépendant.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dependent m, n (feminine singular dependentă, masculine plural dependenți, feminine and neuter plural dependente)

  1. dependent

Declension[edit]

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