mens

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See also: men's

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

mens

  1. Misspelling of men's.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

mens

  1. (nonstandard, African-American Vernacular) Alternative form of men (plural of man)

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch mens, from Middle Dutch mensche, from Old Dutch mennisko, from Proto-Germanic *manniskaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mens (plural mense)

  1. person; human being

Pronoun[edit]

mens

  1. one (indefinite pronoun)
    Synonym: 'n mens

Danish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse meðan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

mens

  1. while (during the same time that)
  2. while (although)
  3. whereas

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch mensche, from Old Dutch mennisko, a substantivised form of the adjective *mennisk (human, humanlike), from Proto-Germanic *manniskaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mɛns/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mens
  • Rhymes: -ɛns

Noun[edit]

mens m (plural mensen, diminutive mensje n)

  1. human, any member of the species Homo sapiens
    De mens is van nature een politiek dier.
    Man is by nature a political animal.
    Ik ben ook maar een mens!
    I'm only human!
  2. person

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: mens
  • Negerhollands: mensch, mens
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: mens

Noun[edit]

mens n (plural mensen, diminutive mensje n)

  1. (informal, derogatory) woman
    Dat mens werkt me echt op de zenuwen.
    That woman really annoys me.

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mens

  1. inflection of mentir:
    1. first/second-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Ladin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mensis.

Noun[edit]

mens m (plural mensc)

  1. month

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *mentis, from Proto-Indo-European *méntis (thought). Cognate with Sanskrit मति (matí), αὐτόματος (autómatos), μάντις (mántis), Russian мнить (mnitʹ, to think), Old English ġemynd (whence English mind).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mēns f (genitive mentis); third declension

  1. mind
  2. intellect, reason
  3. reasoning, judgement
  4. heart, conscience (seat of the thoughts and will)
  5. disposition
    Synonyms: indolēs, ingenium, habitus, nātūra, character
  6. thought, plan, purpose, intention
    Synonyms: cōgitātiō, voluntās, intentiō, propositum, cōnsilium, animus, spōns

Usage notes[edit]

In Classical Latin, the ablative singular mente was used with a feminine adjective to form a manner adjunct that expressed a person's intent, state of mind:

  • 1st century BCE, Catullus, poem 8, line 11:
    sed obstinātā mente perfer, obdūrā
    but with a resolute mind endure, be firm.
  • 29-19 BCE, Virgil, Aenid, book 4, line 105:
    sēnsit enim simulātā mente locūtam
    for she realized that (she) had spoken with false purpose.

In Late Latin, this construction began to be grammaticalised as a phrasal adverb and extended to other adjectives and uses as well; this process was finalised in Romance, resulting in a generic adverbial suffix (though still unstressed and separable in Spanish when more than one adverb is coordinated).

Declension[edit]

The declension is identical to the standard I-stem pattern, except with the accusative and ablative singulars using the consonantal endings. Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mēns mentēs
Genitive mentis mentium
Dative mentī mentibus
Accusative mentem mentēs
mentīs
Ablative mente mentibus
Vocative mēns mentēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

From the noun itself:

From the ablative mente, used as an adverbial suffix:

References[edit]

  • mens”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • mens”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mens in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to attract universal attention: omnium animos or mentes in se convertere
    • to free one's mind from the influences of the senses: sevocare mentem a sensibus (De Nat. D. 3. 8. 21)
    • to be out of one's mind: mente captum esse, mente alienata esse
    • to possess great ability: intellegentia or mente multum valere
    • to grasp a thing mentally: animo, mente, cogitatione aliquid comprehendere, complecti
    • something comes into my mind: mihi in mentem venit alicuius rei
    • to fix all one's thoughts on an object: mentem in aliqua re defigere
    • to think over, consider a thing: agitare (in) mente or (in) animo aliquid
    • with the intention of..: eo consilio, ea mente, ut
    • nothing will ever make me forgetful of him: semper memoria eius in (omnium) mentibus haerebit
    • a man's soul breathes through his writings: alicuius mens in scriptis spirat
    • to upset a person: alicuius mentem turbare, conturbare, perturbare
    • to compose oneself with difficulty: mente vix constare (Tusc. 4. 17. 39)
    • to be calm, self-possessed: mente consistere
    • a good conscience: mens bene sibi conscia
    • to be tormented by remorse: (mens scelerum furiis agitatur)
    • superstition has taken possession of their souls: superstitio mentes occupavit (Verr. 4. 51. 113)
    • (ambiguous) to see with the mind's eye: oculis mentis videre aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to be of sane mind: mentis compotem esse
    • (ambiguous) to be of sound mind: sanae mentis esse
    • (ambiguous) to obscure the mental vision: mentis quasi luminibus officere (vid. sect. XIII. 6) or animo caliginem offundere
    • (ambiguous) innate ideas: notiones animo (menti) insitae, innatae
    • (ambiguous) to lose one's composure; to be disconcerted: de statu suo or mentis deici (Att. 16. 15)
    • (ambiguous) to lose one's head, be beside oneself: sui (mentis) compotem non esse
    • (ambiguous) enthusiasm: ardor, inflammatio animi, incitatio mentis, mentis vis incitatior
  • mens”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mens in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • mens”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse meðan

Conjunction[edit]

mens

  1. while

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

mens m (definite singular mensen, indefinite plural mens or menser, definite plural mensene)

  1. short for menstruasjon (menstruation), a monthly period.

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

mens m (definite singular mensen, indefinite plural mensar, definite plural mensane)

  1. short for menstruasjon (menstruation), a monthly period.

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin minus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mens

  1. less
    Antonyms: mai, pus

Derived terms[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Noun[edit]

mens

  1. indefinite genitive singular of men

Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Syncopic form of medans, in turn a colloquial form of medan (while).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

mens

  1. (colloquial) while
    Jag dukar fram frukost mens du duschar.
    I’ll arrange breakfast while you take a shower.
    Synonyms: medan, (colloquial) medans

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of menstruation.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mens c

  1. menstruation, period
Declension[edit]
Declension of mens 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative mens mensen
Genitive mens mensens
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mens

  1. indefinite genitive singular of men.
  2. indefinite genitive plural of men.

Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mens

  1. people