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See consulō.



cōnsilium n ‎(genitive cōnsiliī); second declension

  1. plan
    • Publilius Syrus, Sententiae
      Malum est consilium, quod mutari non potest.
      Bad is the plan, which can not be changed.
  2. council, advisory body
  3. judgment, wisdom
  4. advice


Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cōnsilium cōnsilia
genitive cōnsiliī cōnsiliōrum
dative cōnsiliō cōnsiliīs
accusative cōnsilium cōnsilia
ablative cōnsiliō cōnsiliīs
vocative cōnsilium cōnsilia



  • consilium in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • consilium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • CONSILIUM in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • consilium” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to form a plan, make a resolution: consilium capere, inire (de aliqua re, with Gen. gerund., with Inf., more rarely ut)
    • to give up a project, an intention: consilio desistere
    • to let a plan fall through: consilium abicere or deponere
    • to be deterred from one's intention by something: a consilio deterreri aliqua re
    • to adopt half-measures: mediocribus consiliis uti
    • to alter one's views, intentions: consilium, sententiam mutare
    • to go one's own way, proceed independently: suo consilio uti
    • (1) to communicate one's plans to some one; (2) to make common cause with a person. Similarly c. causam, rationem: consilia cum aliquo communicare
    • to take common counsel: consilia inter se communicare
    • to consult a person, take his advice: aliquem in or ad consilium adhibere
    • to deliberate together (of a number of people): consilium habere (de aliqua re)
    • to be present at secret consultations: consiliis arcanis interesse (Liv. 35. 18)
    • to give a person advice: consilium dare alicui
    • to give a person the advantage of one's advice (and actual support): aliquem consilio (et re) iuvare
    • I put myself at your disposal as regards advice: consilii mei copiam facio tibi
    • to apply to a person for advice: consilium petere ab aliquo
    • to be perplexed: consilii inopem esse
    • advice is useless in this case; the situation is very embarrassing: omnia consilia frigent (Verr. 2. 25)
    • without reflection; inconsiderately; rashly: nullo consilio, nulla ratione, temere
    • I am undecided..: incertus sum, quid consilii capiam
    • to abide by one's resolution: propositum, consilium tenere (opp. a proposito deterreri)
    • to persevere in one's resolve: in proposito susceptoque consilio permanere
    • to have recourse to extreme measures: descendere ad extrema consilia (Fam. 10. 33. 4)
    • my intention is..: consilium est c. Inf. or ut
    • with the intention of..: eo consilio, ea mente, ut
    • to make virtue the standard in every thought and act: omnia consilia et facta ad virtutem referre (Phil. 10. 10. 20)
    • to act reasonably, judiciously: prudenter, considerate, consilio agere (opp. temere, nullo consilio, nulla ratione)
    • thought and deed: consilia et facta (cf. sect. X. 1, note For 'thoughts and deeds'...)
    • statesmen: auctores consilii publici
    • a man's policy is aiming at, directed towards..: alicuius in re publica or capessendae rei publicae consilia eo spectant, ut...
    • a political ally: consiliorum in re publica socius
    • the council of the nation; the senate: publicum consilium (Phil. 7.7. 19)
    • to hold a council of war: consilium habere, convocare
    • to refer a matter to a council of war: rem ad consilium deferre
  • consilium in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • consilium in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin