natura

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See also: natură, natüra, and nátura

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin natura.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

natura f (plural natures)

  1. nature

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From naturo +‎ -a.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /naˈtura/
  • Rhymes: -ura
  • Hyphenation: na‧tu‧ra

Adjective[edit]

natura (accusative singular naturan, plural naturaj, accusative plural naturajn)

  1. natural
    Antonyms: kontraŭnatura, nenatura

Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin natura.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

natura f (plural naturas)

  1. vulva of a female mammal
  2. nature
  3. manner, way
  4. essence
  5. (archaic) type, kind, lineage

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • natura” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.
  • natura” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • natura” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • natura” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • natura” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • natura” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nātūra.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /naˈtu.ra/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

natura f (plural nature)

  1. nature
  2. essence, character

Related terms[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Noun[edit]

natura f (plural natures)

  1. nature

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish natura, borrowed from Latin nātūra (compare Spanish natura).

Noun[edit]

natura f (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling נאטורה‎)

  1. nature

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From nāscor, gnāscor (be born).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nātūra f (genitive nātūrae); first declension

  1. nature, quality, or essence of a thing
  2. character, temperament, inclination
  3. the natural world
    • natura non facit saltus
      Nature does not make leaps.
  4. penis
    • Apuleius, The Golden Ass, translated P.G. Walsh
      nec ullum miserae reformationis video solacium, nisi quod mihi iam nequeunti tenere Photidem natura crescebat
      The sole consolation I could see in this wretched transformation was the swelling of my penis - though now I could not embrace Photis.
  5. (rare) birth

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative nātūra nātūrae
Genitive nātūrae nātūrārum
Dative nātūrae nātūrīs
Accusative nātūram nātūrās
Ablative nātūrā nātūrīs
Vocative nātūra nātūrae

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Participle[edit]

nātūra

  1. nominative feminine singular of nātūrus
  2. nominative neuter plural of nātūrus
  3. accusative neuter plural of nātūrus
  4. vocative feminine singular of nātūrus
  5. vocative neuter plural of nātūrus

Participle[edit]

nātūrā

  1. ablative feminine singular of nātūrus

References[edit]

  • natura in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • natura in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • natura in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to die a natural death: debitum naturae reddere (Nep. Reg. 1)
    • to devote oneself to the study of a natural science: se conferre ad naturae investigationem
    • innate goodness, kindness: naturae bonitas (Off. 1. 32. 118)
    • natural advantages: naturae bona
    • (ambiguous) creation; nature: rerum natura or simply natura
    • (ambiguous) climate: caelum or natura caeli
    • (ambiguous) the natural position of a place: natura loci
    • (ambiguous) natural gifts: natura et ingenium
    • (ambiguous) to do a thing which is not one's vocation, which goes against the grain: adversante et repugnante natura or invitā Minervā (ut aiunt) aliquid facere (Off. 1. 31. 110)
    • (ambiguous) to have a natural propensity to vice: natura proclivem esse ad vitia
    • (ambiguous) character: natura et mores; vita moresque; indoles animi ingeniique; or simply ingenium, indoles, natura, mores
    • (ambiguous) Nature has implanted in all men the idea of a God: natura in omnium animis notionem dei impressit (N. D. 1. 16. 43)
    • (ambiguous) to reconnoitre the ground: loca, regiones, loci naturam explorare
    • (ambiguous) a town with a strong natural position: oppidum natura loci munitum (B. G. 1. 38)
  • natura in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nātūra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

natura f (plural naturi)

  1. nature

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin nātūra.

Noun[edit]

natura f (nominative singular natura)

  1. nature

Related terms[edit]


Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin nātūram, accusative of nātūra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

natura f (plural naturas)

  1. nature, quality
    • c. 1250: Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 7v.
      […] aquella tierra o son falladas otras piedras de muchas naturas ¬ muy nobles de que fablaremos adelante en eſte libro […]
      […] that land where other stones with many and very noble natures are found, of which we will speak later in this book […]
    • Idem, f. 45r.
      De natura es fria et ſeca. ¬ las ſus uertudes son contrarias a ſu natura. […]
      And it is cold and dry in nature, and its virtues are contrary to its nature; […]
  2. (anatomy) vulva, female genitals
    • c. 1250: Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 9r.
      Et aun a otra uertud muy eſtranna. que ſi la molieré ¬ la amaſſaren có uino ¬ fizieré della como bellota. ¬ la puſieren en la natura dela mugier, uieda que no enprenne.
      And it has yet another very strange virtue; that if it were to be ground and mixed with wine and shaped like an acorn, and put inside the vulva of the woman, it would prevent her from not becoming pregnant.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Piedmontese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

natura f (plural nature)

  1. nature

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin nātūra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

natura f

  1. nature

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • natura in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish natura, borrowed from Latin nātūra[1].

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /naˈtuɾa/, [naˈt̪uɾa]
  • Hyphenation: na‧tu‧ra

Noun[edit]

natura f (plural naturas)

  1. nature
    Synonym: naturaleza

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin in natura, used since the 17th century.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

natura c (uncountable)

  1. in-kind (non-monetary payment), most often used in the adverbial postfix phrase in natura, sometimes i natura, and in compounds
    betalning i natura
    in-kind payment

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]