humor

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See also: Humor, humør, and humör

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

humor ‎(plural humors)

  1. American spelling of humour
    He was in a particularly vile humor that afternoon.
    • 1763, Antoine-Simon Le Page du Pratz, History of Louisiana (PG), p. 40
      For some days a fistula lacrymalis had come into my left eye, which discharged an humour, when pressed, that portended danger.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.

Verb[edit]

humor ‎(third-person singular simple present humors, present participle humoring, simple past and past participle humored)

  1. American spelling of humour
    I know you don't believe my story, but humor me for a minute and imagine it to be true.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

humor m ‎(plural humores)

  1. mood (mental state)
  2. humour

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

humor m

  1. humor (US), humour (UK) (source of amusement)

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • humor in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • humor in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English humor (US), from Old French humor ‎(bodily fluid), from Latin humor. See also: humore, humoor, humoristisch, and humuer.

The meaning of humor as in "a sense of amusement" entered Dutch from the US spelling of humour around ~1839.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɦymɔr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mor

Noun[edit]

humor m ‎(plural humoren or humores)

  1. (uncountable) humour (sense of amusement)
  2. (countable, archaic) humour (bodily fluid) [from the 15th c.]

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin humor.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhumor/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mor

Noun[edit]

humor ‎(plural humorok)

  1. humour, humor

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

(Compound words):

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Alternative spelling of umor found in the later Roman Empire, when the letter "h" already became silent.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hūmor m ‎(genitive hūmōris); third declension

  1. liquid, fluid, humour

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative hūmor hūmōrēs
genitive hūmōris hūmōrum
dative hūmōrī hūmōribus
accusative hūmōrem hūmōrēs
ablative hūmōre hūmōribus
vocative hūmor hūmōrēs

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

humor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of humō

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin humor, via German Humor and English humour or humor

Noun[edit]

humor m ‎(definite singular humoren)

  1. humour (UK) or humor (US)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin humor, via German Humor and English humour or humor

Noun[edit]

humor m ‎(definite singular humoren)

  1. humor (US) or humour (UK)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

humor m, f

  1. humor (One of four fluids that were believed to control the health and mood of the human body.)

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Humor, ultimately from Latin. See humor for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

humor m inan

  1. humour
  2. mood (mental state)

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese umor, humor, from Latin hūmor ‎(humour, fluid).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

humor m (plural humores)

  1. mood (mental state)
  2. humour; bodily fluid
  3. (historical) humour (one of the four basic bodily fluids in humourism)
  4. humour (quality of being comical)

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:humor.

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English humor.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /xǔmor/
  • Hyphenation: hu‧mor

Noun[edit]

hùmor m (Cyrillic spelling ху̀мор)

  1. (uncountable) humor

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

humor m ‎(plural humores)

  1. mood
  2. humor

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Originally from Latin humor ‎(fluid), having bodily fluids in good balance, as used in humör ‎(mood, temper). The joking sense was derived in England in Shakespeare's time and has been used in Swedish since 1812.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

humor c

  1. humour (a sense of making jokes)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]