nod

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See also: NOD, Nod, nód, nöd, nød, -nod, and -nöd

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English nodden, probably from an unrecorded Old English *hnodian (to nod, shake the head), from Proto-Germanic *hnudōną (to beat, rivet, pound, push), from Proto-Indo-European *kendʰ-, from *ken- (to scratch, scrape, rub).[1] Compare Old High German hnotōn (to shake), hnutten (to shake, rattle, vibrate) (> modern dialectal German notteln, nütteln (to rock, move back and forth)), Icelandic hnjóða (to rivet, clinch).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

nod (third-person singular simple present nods, present participle nodding, simple past and past participle nodded)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To incline the head up and down, as to indicate agreement.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To briefly incline the head downwards as a cursory greeting.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To sway, move up and down.
    • 1818, John Keats, “Book I”, in Endymion: A Poetic Romance, London: [] [T. Miller] for Taylor and Hessey, [], OCLC 1467112, page 1:
      By every wind that nods the mountain pine.
    • 1819, William Wordsworth, On Seeing a Tuft of Snowdrops in a Storm
      Frail snowdrops that together cling / and nod their helmets, smitten by the wing / of many a furious whirl-blast sweeping by.
  4. (intransitive) To gradually fall asleep.
  5. (transitive) To signify by a nod.
    They nodded their assent.
  6. (intransitive) To make a mistake by being temporarily inattentive or tired
    Even Homer nods.
  7. (transitive, intransitive, soccer) To head; to strike the ball with one's head.
    Jones nods the ball back to his goalkeeper.
    • 2010 December 29, Chris Whyatt, “Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton”, in BBC[1]:
      With the hosts not able to find their passes - everything that went forward was too heavy or too short - Terry once again had to come to his side's rescue after Davies had brilliantly nodded into the path of Elmander, who followed up swiftly with a deflected shot.
  8. (intransitive, figuratively) To allude to something.
    • March 15 2012, Soctt Tobias, The Kid With A Bike [Review]
      Though the title nods to the Italian neo-realist classic Bicycle Thieves—and Cyril, much like the father and son in that movie, spends much of his time tracking down the oft-stolen possession—The Kid With A Bike isn’t about the bike as something essential to his livelihood, but as his sole connection to the freedom and play of childhood itself.
  9. (intransitive, slang) To fall asleep while under the influence of opiates.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

nod (plural nods)

  1. An instance of inclining the head up and down, as to indicate agreement, or as a cursory greeting.
  2. A reference or allusion to something.
    • 2012 May 31, Tasha Robinson, “Film: Review: Snow White And The Huntsman”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[2]:
      Much like Mirror Mirror, Huntsman appears to borrow liberally from other fantasy films. Sometimes the nods are clever—Stewart’s first night in the forest, among hallucinatory fog that gives the trees faces and clutching hands, evokes Disney’s animated Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs from 1937.
  3. A nomination.
    For the fifth time in her career she received a Grammy nod, she has yet to win the award.
    • 2011 Allen Gregory, "Pilot" (season 1, episode 1):
      Allen Gregory DeLongpre: Really putting a damper on the ol' Tony nod.
  4. (figuratively) Approval.
    The plan is expected to get the nod from councillors at the next meeting.
    • 1964 August, “News and Comment: One main line to Scotland?”, in Modern Railways, page 86:
      Has the BRB received a secret nod from the Ministry to continue the LMR electrification from Weaver Junction to Glasgow?

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “nod”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin nōdus. Compare Daco-Romanian nod.

Noun[edit]

nod

  1. knot

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin nōdō. Compare Daco-Romanian înnoda, înnod (archaic noda).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

nod (past participle nudatã)

  1. I knot, tie a knot.
Related terms[edit]

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish not, from Latin nota. Doublet of nóta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nod m (genitive singular noid, nominative plural noda)

  1. scribal contraction, abbreviation
  2. hint (clue; tacit suggestion)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Northern Kurdish[edit]

Numeral[edit]

nod

  1. ninety

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

nod n (definite singular nodet, indefinite plural nod, definite plural noda)

  1. a bent spike on a nail (or similar) which is hammered through a medium (e.g. a piece of wood)

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *naudi

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nōd f

  1. a need
  2. a necessity for something

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: nōt
    • Westphalian:
      Sauerländisch: nôd
      Westmünsterländisch: Nood
    • Plautdietsch: Noot

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nōdus, from Proto-Indo-European *gned-, *gnod- (to bind).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nod n (plural noduri)

  1. knot

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin nota.[1] Cognate with Cornish nos.

Noun[edit]

nod m (plural nodau, not mutable)

  1. mark, brand
  2. aim, objective, goal
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English node, from Latin nodus.

Noun[edit]

nod m (plural nodau or nodion, not mutable)

  1. node

Etymology 3[edit]

Mutated form of dod (to come).

Verb[edit]

nod

  1. Nasal mutation of dod.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dod ddod nod unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “nod”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies