opiate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Opiate

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English opiate, from Medieval Latin opiātus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK)
    • (adjective, noun) enPR: ōʹpē-ət, IPA(key): /ˈəʊpi.ət/
    • (file)
    • (verb) enPR: ōʹpē-āt', IPA(key): /ˈəʊpiˌeɪt/
    • (file)
  • (US)
    • (adjective, noun) enPR: ōʹpē-ət, IPA(key): /ˈoʊpi.ət/
    • (verb) enPR: ōʹpē-āt, IPA(key): /ˌoʊpieɪt/

Adjective[edit]

opiate (not comparable)

  1. Relating to, resembling, or containing opium.
  2. (pharmacology) Soporific; inducing sleep or sedation.
  3. Deadening; causing apathy or dullness.

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

opiate (plural opiates)

  1. (pharmacology) A drug, hormone or other substance derived from or related to opium.
  2. Something that dulls the senses and induces a false and unrealistic sense of contentment.
    • 1692, Richard Bentley, [A Confutation of Atheism] (please specify the sermon), London: [Thomas Parkhurst; Henry Mortlock], published 1692–1693:
      They chose atheism as an opiate.
    • 1831, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Romance and Reality, volume 3, page 230:
      The music—the fragrance of the flowers, whose odour was exhaling in the now falling dew—the languor of recent exertion—the sense of past dangers and present security—operated on Beatrice like the first and delicious stage of an opiate.

Hypernyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

opiate (third-person singular simple present opiates, present participle opiating, simple past and past participle opiated)

  1. (transitive) To treat with an opiate drug.

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

opiāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of opiātus

Lithuanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

opiate m

  1. locative singular of opiatas
  2. vocative singular of opiatas