acta

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See also: ACTA and actă

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin ācta (register of events), plural of āctum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

acta f (plural actes)

  1. act (of a parliament)

Further reading[edit]

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

acta

  1. third-person singular past historic of acter

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the verb agō (make, do).

Noun[edit]

ācta n pl (genitive āctōrum); second declension

  1. acts, transactions, or proceedings (e.g., of an organization, in an academic field, of an office holder).
  2. journal; register of public events; newspaper.
    Synonym: ephēmeris
Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter), plural only.

Case Plural
Nominative ācta
Genitive āctōrum
Dative āctīs
Accusative ācta
Ablative āctīs
Vocative ācta
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Catalan: acta
  • English: act
  • Galician: acta
  • German: Akte
  • Indonesian: akta (learned)
  • Malay: akta (learned)
  • Norwegian Bokmål: akt
  • Portuguese: ata
  • Spanish: acta

Participle[edit]

ācta

  1. inflection of āctus:
    1. nominative/vocative feminine singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter plural

Participle[edit]

āctā

  1. ablative feminine singular of āctus

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἀκτή (aktḗ).

Noun[edit]

acta f (genitive actae); first declension

  1. seashore, beach
  2. (figuratively, plural only) holiday
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative acta actae
Genitive actae actārum
Dative actae actīs
Accusative actam actās
Ablative actā actīs
Vocative acta actae

References[edit]

  • acta”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • acta”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • acta in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • acta in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) I'm undone! it's all up with me: perii! actum est de me! (Ter. Ad. 3. 2. 26)
    • (ambiguous) to have all one's trouble for nothing: rem actam or simply actum agere (proverb.)
    • (ambiguous) it's all over with me; I'm a lost man: actum est de me
    • (ambiguous) a good conscience: conscientia recta, recte facti (factorum), virtutis, bene actae vitae, rectae voluntatis
    • (ambiguous) to declare a magistrate's decisions null and void: acta rescindere, dissolvere (Phil. 13. 3. 5)
    • (ambiguous) amnesty (ἀμνηρτία): ante actarum (praeteritarum) rerum oblivio or simply oblivio
  • acta”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • acta”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin ācta (register of public events).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ac‧ta

Noun[edit]

acta f (plural actas)

  1. Pre-reform spelling (until Brazil 1943/Portugal 1990) of ata. Still used in countries where the agreement hasn't come into effect; may occur as a sporadic misspelling.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from Latin acta.

Noun[edit]

acta n (uncountable)

  1. collection of documents

Declension[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin ācta (register of events), plural of āctum, from agō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɡta/ [ˈaɣ̞.t̪a]
  • Audio (Venezuela):(file)
  • Rhymes: -aɡta
  • Syllabification: ac‧ta

Noun[edit]

acta f (plural actas)

  1. certificate
  2. minutes, record
  3. election results

Usage notes[edit]

  • Feminine nouns beginning with stressed /ˈa/ like this one regularly take the singular articles el and un, usually reserved for masculine nouns.
    el acta, un acta
  • They maintain the usual feminine singular articles la and una if an adjective intervenes between the article and the noun.

Further reading[edit]