acta

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See also: ACTA

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ācta (register of events), plural of āctum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

acta f (plural actes)

  1. act (of a parliament)

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

acta

  1. third-person singular past historic of acter

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the verb agō (make, do).

Noun[edit]

ācta n pl (genitive āctōrum); second declension

  1. acts, transactions, or proceedings (e.g., of an organization, in an academic field, of an office holder).
  2. journal; register of public events; newspaper.
    Synonym: ephēmeris
Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter), plural only.

Case Plural
Nominative ācta
Genitive āctōrum
Dative āctīs
Accusative ācta
Ablative āctīs
Vocative ācta
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Catalan: acta
  • English: act
  • Galician: acta
  • German: Akte
  • Norwegian Bokmål: akt
  • Portuguese: ata
  • Spanish: acta

Participle[edit]

ācta

  1. inflection of āctus:
    1. nominative/vocative feminine singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter plural

Participle[edit]

āctā

  1. ablative feminine singular of āctus

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἀκτή (aktḗ).

Noun[edit]

acta f (genitive actae); first declension

  1. seashore, beach
  2. (figuratively, plural only) holiday
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative acta actae
Genitive actae actārum
Dative actae actīs
Accusative actam actās
Ablative actā actīs
Vocative acta actae

References[edit]

  • acta”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • acta”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • acta in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • acta in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) I'm undone! it's all up with me: perii! actum est de me! (Ter. Ad. 3. 2. 26)
    • (ambiguous) to have all one's trouble for nothing: rem actam or simply actum agere (proverb.)
    • (ambiguous) it's all over with me; I'm a lost man: actum est de me
    • (ambiguous) a good conscience: conscientia recta, recte facti (factorum), virtutis, bene actae vitae, rectae voluntatis
    • (ambiguous) to declare a magistrate's decisions null and void: acta rescindere, dissolvere (Phil. 13. 3. 5)
    • (ambiguous) amnesty (ἀμνηρτία): ante actarum (praeteritarum) rerum oblivio or simply oblivio
  • acta”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • acta”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin ācta (register of public events).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ac‧ta

Noun[edit]

acta f (plural actas)

  1. Superseded spelling of ata. (Superseded in Brazil by the 1943 spelling reform and by the Portuguese Language Orthographic Agreement of 1990 elsewhere. Still used in countries where the agreement hasn’t come into effect and as an alternative spelling in Portugal.)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from Latin acta.

Noun[edit]

acta n (uncountable)

  1. collection of documents

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ācta (register of events), plural of āctum, from agō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɡta/, [ˈaɣ̞.t̪a]

Noun[edit]

acta f (plural actas)

  1. certificate
  2. minutes, record
  3. election results

Usage notes[edit]

  • The feminine noun acta is like other feminine nouns starting with a stressed /a/ sound in that it takes the articles el and un (normally reserved for masculine nouns) in the singular when there is no intervening adjective:
el acta
un acta
  • However, if an adjective, even one that begins with stressed /a/ such as alta or ancha, intervenes between the article and the noun, the article reverts to la or una.

Further reading[edit]