latex

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See also: látex and LaTeX

English[edit]

Latex being extracted from a tree

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin latex ‎(clear fluid which is part of a humour or bodily fluid), a later use of Latin latex ‎(water; liquid, fluid). Potential a borrowing from Ancient Greek λᾰ́τᾰξ ‎(látaks, drop of wine), reformed by analogy to other nouns in -ex. The semantic shift, however, from drop of wine to water is difficult to explain and may indicate that both words originated from a separate language. Perhaps from the same root as Proto-Celtic *lati- (Old Irish laith ‎(liquid, beer), Welsh llad ‎(beer)) or Proto-Germanic *ladjō- (Old High German letto ‎(clay, loam), Old Norse leðja ‎(mud, dregs)) or from a Pre-Greek language.[1][2][3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

latex ‎(plural latices or latexes)

  1. (medicine, archaic, rare) A clear liquid believed to be a component of a humour or other bodily fluid (esp. plasma and lymph)
  2. The milky sap of several trees that coagulates on exposure to air; used to make rubber.
  3. An emulsion of rubber in water, used in adhesives and the like.
  4. (uncountable) Natural latex rubber, especially non-vulcanized rubber, such as is used in making latex gloves, latex condoms, and latex clothing.

Translations[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “latex” in Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, page 329
  2. ^ “λάταξ” in Robert S. P. Beekes (2010) Etymological Dictionary of Greek, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, volume I, page 837
  3. ^ "latex" in M. Philippa - Etymologisch Woordenboek van het Nederlands, Amsterdam University Press 2009 (etymologiebank)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin latex ‎(clear fluid which is part of a humour or bodily fluid), a later use of Latin latex ‎(water; liquid, fluid).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

latex m ‎(uncountable)

  1. latex (milky sap of trees)
  2. latex (emulsion of rubber in water)

References[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Potential a borrowing from Ancient Greek λᾰ́τᾰξ ‎(látaks, drop of wine), reformed by analogy to other nouns in -ex. The semantic shift, however, from drop of wine to water is difficult to explain and may indicate that both words originated from a separate language. Perhaps from the same root as Proto-Celtic *lati- (Old Irish laith ‎(liquid, beer), Welsh llad ‎(beer)) or Proto-Germanic *ladjō- (Old High German letto ‎(clay, loam), Old Norse leðja ‎(mud, dregs)) or from a Pre-Greek language.[1][2][3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

latex m ‎(genitive laticis); third declension

(classical, chiefly poetic)
  1. water
  2. liquid, fluid
  3. (in the plural) springs
  4. juice, oil, milk
(New Latin)
  1. (medicine) A clear liquid believed to be a component of a humour or other bodily fluid (esp. plasma and lymph)
  2. (botany) Milky liquid which exudes from a plant when cut and which coagulates on exposure to air.

Declension[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative latex laticēs
genitive laticis laticum
dative laticī laticibus
accusative laticem laticēs
ablative latice laticibus
vocative latex laticēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “latex” in Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, page 329
  2. ^ “λάταξ” in Robert S. P. Beekes (2010) Etymological Dictionary of Greek, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, volume I, page 837
  3. ^ "latex" in M. Philippa - Etymologisch Woordenboek van het Nederlands, Amsterdam University Press 2009 (etymologiebank)