saper

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: sapér and såper

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Classial Latin sapiō, sapere (taste).

Verb[edit]

saper

  1. to know

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sa.pe/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Italian zappare (to hoe).

Verb[edit]

saper

  1. (transitive) to sap, do sapping work on (to subvert by digging)
  2. (transitive, figuratively) to erode, wear down, undermine
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown.

Verb[edit]

saper

  1. (informal, transitive, reflexive, Europe, Africa) to dress
    Ce type-là est toujours bien sapé.
    That guy is always well-dressed.

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

saper

  1. (transitive, informal, Quebec) to eat or chew noisily
  2. (transitive, informal, Quebec) to slurp

Etymology 4[edit]

From sape, from Latin sappa. Compare Italian zappare, Friulian sapâ, Venetian sapar, Romanian săpa.

Verb[edit]

saper

  1. (agriculture) to harvest or reap forage or cereals with a small scythe
Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

saper

  1. to know

Conjugation[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

saper

  1. Apocopic form of sapere

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sapeur, from Middle French sappeur.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

saper m pers (feminine saperka)

  1. combat engineer, sapper

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • saper in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • saper in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Noun[edit]

saper

  1. (Eastern dialect) flying fox, fruit bat

Synonyms[edit]