forage

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English forage, from Old French fourage, forage, a derivative of fuerre (fodder, straw), from Frankish *fōdar (fodder, sheath), from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (fodder, feed, sheath), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to protect, to feed).

Cognate with Old High German fuotar (German Futter (fodder, feed)), Old English fōdor, fōþor (food, fodder, covering, case, basket), Dutch voeder (forage, food, feed), Danish foder (fodder, feed), Icelandic fóðr (fodder, sheath). More at fodder, food.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

forage (countable and uncountable, plural forages)

  1. Fodder for animals, especially cattle and horses.
    • 1819, Sir Walter Scott, Ivanhoe:[1]
      “The hermit was apparently somewhat moved to compassion by the anxiety as well as address which the stranger displayed in tending his horse; for, muttering something about provender left for the keeper's palfrey, he dragged out of a recess a bundle of forage, which he spread before the knight's charger.
    • 1697, Virgil, “The Fourth Book of the Æneis”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      To invade the corn, and to their cells convey
      The plundered forage of their yellow prey
  2. An act or instance of foraging.
  3. (obsolete) The demand for fodder etc by an army from the local population

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Verb[edit]

forage (third-person singular simple present forages, present participle foraging, simple past and past participle foraged)

  1. To search for and gather food for animals, particularly cattle and horses.
    • 1841, James Fenimore Cooper, The Deerslayer, Chapter 8:
      The message said that the party intended to hunt and forage through this region, for a month or two, afore it went back into the Canadas.
  2. To rampage through, gathering and destroying as one goes.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii]:
      And your great-uncle's, Edward the Black Prince, / Who on the French ground play'd a tragedy, / Making defeat on the full power of France, / Whiles his most mighty father on a hill / Stood smiling to behold his lion's whelp / Forage in blood of French nobility.
  3. To rummage.
  4. Of an animal: to seek out and eat food.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From forer +‎ -age.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

forage m (plural forages)

  1. drilling (act of drilling)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French fourage; the first element is cognate to fodder.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔːˈraːdʒ(ə)/, /fɔˈraːdʒ(ə)/

Noun[edit]

forage (uncountable)

  1. forage (especially dry)

Descendants[edit]

  • English: forage

References[edit]