lar

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See also: lär, làr, lár, lår, lár-, -lar, LAr, LAR, and Lar

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin lār (ancestral deity or spirit) from Etruscan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lar (plural lars or lares or Lars or Lares)

  1. (Roman mythology, usu. plural) singular of Lares: a household god, particularly overseeing the family itself.
    • 1974, Guy Davenport, Tatlin!:
      Would the great emperor’s lar, free of its soldierly body rheumatic from German mists and browned and grizzled by the Indus sun, haunt that pinedark road to Elefsis to taste again the essences on which it fed and gather with voluptuous fingers the ghosts of roses?
  2. The lar gibbon.

Usage notes[edit]

The gibbon is pluralized as lars. The Latin household gods usually appear as the plurale tantum Lares, following its Latin plural form and capitalized to denote a particular group of lares; the alternative forms Lars, lares, and lars sometimes appear.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin laurus.[1]

Noun[edit]

lar m (indefinite plural larë, definite singular lari, definite plural larët)

  1. (botany) laurel (Laurus)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vladimir Orel, Albanian Etymological Dictionary (Leiden: Brill, 1998), 213–4.

Galician[edit]

Traditional lar or lareira

Etymology[edit]

From Latin larem (guardian spirit; home), from Etruscan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lar m (plural lares)

  1. home (place or building where one dwells)
    Miña casiña meu lar.
    My house, my home.
  2. fireside
  3. hearth
    • 1485, Antonio López Ferreiro (ed.), Galicia Histórica. Colección diplomática. Santiago: Tipografía Galaica, page 286:
      iten vnna caldeyra de trager agoa, iten hua caldeyra de sobre do lar, iten dous caldeyros de mao
      item, a bucket for carrying water; item a cauldron for hanging over the hearth; item two hand cauldrons
  4. A household or ancestral god in ancient Rome

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • lar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • lar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • lar” in Santamarina, Antón (dir.), Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja: Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega (v 4.0). Santiago: ILG.
  • lar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Etruscan 𐌋𐌀𐌓 (lar), 𐌋𐌀𐌓𐌔 (lars), or 𐌋𐌀𐌓𐌈 (larθ, lord), though it could possibly be from Proto-Indo-European *las- (eager), cognate with lascivus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

lār m (genitive laris); third declension

  1. the protective spirit of a place, particularly a household
  2. home, household

Declension[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative lār larēs
genitive laris larum
dative larī laribus
accusative larem larēs
ablative lare laribus
vocative lār larēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Lar in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lar in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lar in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

lar

  1. Alternative form of lore

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

lar

  1. present tense of la

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

lar

  1. present tense of la

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *laizō, from *laizijaną (to teach). Cognate with Old Saxon lēra, Dutch leer, Old High German lēra (German Lehre).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lār f (nominative plural lāre)

  1. teaching, learning, education
  2. lesson
  3. teaching, doctrine
  4. advice, counsel

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin larem (guardian spirit), from Etruscan 𐌋𐌀𐌓 (lar), 𐌋𐌀𐌓𐌔 (lars), or 𐌋𐌀𐌓𐌈 (larth, lord).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lar m (plural lares)

  1. (affectionate) home (place or building where one dwells)
    Não há lugar como o nosso lar.
    There is no place like home.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lār, lārem, in its current form most likely a learned borrowing[1]. A popular or inherited form also existed, referring to the irons in a hearth on which vats were hung to heat water or make stews. The word may ultimately be of Etruscan origin.

Noun[edit]

lar m (plural lares)

  1. hearth

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]