scarf

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from Old Northern French escarpe (compare Old French escharpe (pilgrim's purse suspended from the neck)). The verb is derived from the noun.

Noun[edit]

scarf (plural scarves or scarfs)

  1. A long, often knitted, garment worn around the neck.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 2, in The China Governess[1]:
      Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.
  2. A headscarf.
  3. (dated) A neckcloth or cravat.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

scarf (third-person singular simple present scarfs, present participle scarfing, simple past and past participle scarfed)

  1. To throw on loosely; to put on like a scarf.
  2. To dress with a scarf, or as with a scarf; to cover with a loose wrapping.

Etymology 2[edit]

A scarf joint
Sewing machine needles with scarf shown on right

Of uncertain origin. Possibly from Old Norse skarfr, derivative of skera (to cut).

Noun[edit]

scarf (plural scarfs)

  1. A type of joint in woodworking.
  2. A groove on one side of a sewing machine needle.
  3. A dip or notch or cut made in the trunk of a tree to direct its fall when felling.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

scarf (third-person singular simple present scarfs, present participle scarfing, simple past and past participle scarfed)

  1. To shape by grinding.
  2. To form a scarf on the end or edge of, as for a joint in timber, forming a "V" groove for welding adjacent metal plates, metal rods, etc.
  3. To unite, as two pieces of timber or metal, by a scarf joint.

Etymology 3[edit]

Generally thought to be a variant, attested since the 1950s, of scoff (eat (quickly)) (of which scorf is another attested variant), itself a variant of scaff.[1][2] Sometimes alternatively suggested to be a dialectal survival of Old English scearfian, sceorfan (gnaw, bite) (compare scurf).[3]

Verb[edit]

scarf (third-person singular simple present scarfs, present participle scarfing, simple past and past participle scarfed)

  1. (transitive, US, slang) To eat very quickly.
    You sure scarfed that pizza.
Usage notes[edit]

The more usual form in the UK is scoff.

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

scarf

  1. (Scotland) A cormorant.

References[edit]

  1. ^ scarf” in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  2. ^ Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Dictionary.com
  3. ^ scarf” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

Anagrams[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *skarpaz, whence also Old Saxon skarp, Old English scearp, Old Norse skarpr. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kerb-, from *(s)ker- (to cut).

Adjective[edit]

scarf

  1. sharp

Descendants[edit]