seel

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Seel

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sel, sele, from Old English *sǣle (good, fortunate, happy) (attested in Old English unsǣle (evil, wicked)), from Proto-Germanic *sēliz (good, happy), from Proto-Indo-European *sel-, *sēl- (to calm, quiet, be favourable). Cognate with Danish sæl (blissful), Swedish säll (blissful), Icelandic sæll (blissful), Gothic 𐍃𐌴𐌻𐍃 (sēls, good, kind, useful), Latin sōlor (to comfort, console).

Adjective[edit]

seel (comparative more seel, superlative most seel)

  1. (obsolete) Good; fortunate; opportune; happy.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English sele, sel, from Old English sǣl (time, occasion, a fit time, season, opportunity, the definite time at which an event should take place, time as in bad or good times, circumstances, condition, position, happiness, joy, good fortune, good time, prosperity), from Proto-Germanic *sēliz (luck, joy), from Proto-Indo-European *sel-, *sēl- (to calm, quiet, be favourable). Cognate with Icelandic sæla (bliss), Dutch zalig (blissful, blessed). More at silly.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

seel (plural seels)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Good fortune; happiness; bliss.
  2. (Britain, dialectal) Opportunity; time; season.
    the seel of the day
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English silen, from Old French siller, ciller (to sew up the eyelids of, hoodwink, wink), from cil (eyelid), from Latin cilium (eyelid, eyelash).

Verb[edit]

seel (third-person singular simple present seels, present participle seeling, simple past and past participle seeled)

  1. (falconry) To sew together the eyes of a young hawk.
    • 1651, William Davenant, Gondibert
      Hey who does blindly soar at Rhodalind []
      Mounts, like seel'd doves, still higher []
  2. (by extension) To blind.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *sīgan (to drop). Compare Low German sielen (to lead off water), French siller (to run ahead, to make headway), and English sile (transitive verb).

Verb[edit]

seel (third-person singular simple present seels, present participle seeling, simple past and past participle seeled)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete, of a ship) To roll on the waves in a storm.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Raleigh to this entry?)

Noun[edit]

seel (plural seels)

  1. (obsolete) The rolling or agitation of a ship in a storm.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sandys to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Ingrian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

seel

  1. there

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *segellum, from Latin sigillum.

Noun[edit]

seel m (oblique plural seeaus or seeax or seiaus or seiax or seels, nominative singular seeaus or seeax or seiaus or seiax or seels, nominative plural seel)

  1. seal (means of authentication for a letter, etc.)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]