cen

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See also: Cen, -cen, cen-, cén, cēn, ceń, and -cén

Galician[edit]

Galician numbers (edit)
1,000
 ←  90  ←  99 100 200  →  1,000  → 
10
    Cardinal: cen
    Ordinal: centésimo
    Multiplier: céntuplo
    Fractional: centésimo

Alternative forms[edit]

  • cento (combining form only)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese cen, from cento, from Latin centum, from Proto-Italic *kentom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

cen (indeclinable)

  1. one hundred; 100

Usage notes[edit]

The indeclinable form cen means "one hundred" only. To say "one hundred one", the combining form cento is used, as cento un or cento unha. Likewise, "one hundred thirty" is cento trinta, and "one hundred fifty-four" is cento cincuenta e catro.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

cen

  1. Nonstandard spelling of cēn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of cén.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *kiʀn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ċēn m

  1. (poetic) torch
  2. the runic character (/k/ or /tʃ/)

Synonyms[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *kina (on this side of), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe (this, here); compare Breton ken (otherwise).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

cen (governs the accusative; triggers lenition)

  1. except
  2. without
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 20d4
      Cía ru·bé cen ní diib, ní·rubai cenaib huli.
      Though he might be without some of them, he could not be without all of them.
  3. not to (followed by a verbal noun)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 9c20
      cid atob·aich cen dílgud cech ancridi do·gnethe frib, et ní bethe fria acre
      what impels you pl not to forgive every injury that may have been done to you, and that you should not be about to sue [because of] it?

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: gan
  • Manx: gyn
  • Scottish Gaelic: gun

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cen chen cen
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /t͡sɛn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛn
  • Syllabification: cen

Noun[edit]

cen f

  1. genitive plural of cena

Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English change.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cen (nominative plural cens)

  1. change, transition, turn

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *kenni- (skin) (compare Cornish kenn (film, skin (on liquid); peel), Breton kenn (scurf, dandruff), Old Irish ceinn (scale)), from Proto-Indo-European *sken- (to split off) (compare German schinden (to strip, peel; skin)); further to Cornish skans (fish scales), Breton skant (fish scales), Irish scain (to tear, burst).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cen m (plural cennau)

  1. (dermatology) scurf, dandruff
    Synonyms: morwdon, mordon
  2. (biology) scale (on fish, bud)
    Synonym: cennyn
  3. (chemistry) scale, scurf, fur (in pipe, boiler, furnace, kettle)
    Synonym: calch
  4. (mycology) lichen

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cen gen nghen chen
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.