cento

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See also: Cento

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cento (patchwork garment).

Noun[edit]

cento (plural centos or centones)

  1. A hotchpotch, a mixture; especially a piece made up of quotations from other authors.
    • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
      Now look out in the GRADUS for Purus, and you find as the first synonime, lacteus, for coloratus, and the first synonime is purpureus. I mention this by way of elucidating one of the most ordinary processes in the ferrumination of these Centos.
    • 1915 September 1, Charles A. Graves, “The Forged Letter of General Lee”, in Southern Historical Society Papers, New Series, number 40, page 124:
      And Captain McCabe says: "I have always regarded the letter as a sort of 'cento' of odds and ends (badly put together) from Lee's genuine letters."
    • 2007, William Poole, “Out of his Furrow”, in London Review of Books, volume 29, number 3, page 16:
      Paradise Lost, as Teskey observes, is a cento, a vast echo chamber of classical texts, all twisted into new shapes.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

cent +‎ -o

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cento (accusative singular centon, plural centoj, accusative plural centojn)

  1. hundred, group of one hundred of something

Galician[edit]

Numeral[edit]

cento

  1. combining form of cen (100).

Usage notes[edit]

The indeclinable form cen means "one hundred" only. To say "one hundred one", the combining form cento is used, as cento un or cento unha. Likewise, "one hundred thirty" is cento trinta, and "one hundred fifty-four" is cento cincuenta e catro.


Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

cento (plural centos)

  1. hundred

Numeral[edit]

cento

  1. a hundred

Italian[edit]

Italian cardinal numbers
 <  99 100 101  > 
    Cardinal : cento
    Ordinal : centesimo

Etymology[edit]

From Latin centum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • cènto, IPA(key): /ˈtʃɛnto/

Adjective[edit]

cento m, f (invariable)

  1. hundred
Italian cardinal numbers
 <  101 102 103  > 
    Cardinal : cento

Noun[edit]

cento m (invariable)

  1. hundred

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek κέντρων (kéntrōn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

centō m (genitive centōnis); third declension

  1. A garment of several pieces sewed together; a patchwork
  2. A cap worn under the helmet

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative centō centōnēs
genitive centōnis centōnum
dative centōnī centōnibus
accusative centōnem centōnēs
ablative centōne centōnibus
vocative centō centōnēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • cento in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cento in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “cento”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • cento in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cento in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin centum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cento m, f

  1. (only in compounds) one hundred
    Cento e duas pessoas vieram.
    One hundred and two people came.

Usage notes[edit]

For 100 itself, cem is used.

Noun[edit]

cento m (plural centos)

  1. hundred (100 units of something)
    Comprei dois centos de maçãs.
    I bought two hundred apples. (literally: I bought two hundreds of apples)