nee

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See also: née and ñee

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

French née, feminine of , past participle of naître, to be born.

Adjective[edit]

nee ‎(not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of née
Usage notes[edit]
  • As it is not a naturalised word in English, nee is often italicised.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English ne or na(no). Cognate with Standard English no.

Interjection[edit]

nee

  1. (Geordie) no, used to express no as a quantity, i.e. not any, like German kein/Dutch geen/French rien. Compare with na.
    Nee way man!‎ ― No way
    Thor's nee watter!‎ ― There's no water!
  • (Can we date this quote?), Griffiths, Bill, A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1-904794-16-5, page 121:

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

nee

  1. no

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch neen, nee, from Old Dutch *nēn(none, not one), from *ne ēn, from Proto-Germanic *ne + *ainaz.

Adverb[edit]

nee

  1. no
    • 1992, A. F. Th. van der Heijden, Weerborstels, Em. Querido's Uitgeverij, page 23:
      Nee, de stemming zat er goed in.
      No, the atmosphere was great.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Nee is used to show disagreement or negation.
    Nee, je vergist je.: No, you are mistaken.
    Nee, je mag nu geen televisie kijken: No, you may not watch television now.
  • Nee has a formal form, neen, which is archaic in spoken language, but quite common in written language.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately cognate to German nein.

Adverb[edit]

nee

  1. (in some dialects) no

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of dialectal origin, particularly German Low German.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

nee

  1. (colloquial, regional) Alternative form of nein(no)

Usage notes[edit]

  • Nee is the most common colloquial word for “no” in northern and central Germany. It has also come to be used quite regularly in southern Germany, while still being rather infrequent in Austria and Switzerland.

External links[edit]

  • nee in Duden online

Low German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Ultimately cognate to German nein, Dutch nee and neen, English no and none.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nee

  1. (in some dialects) no

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German nîe, nige, neye, nîwe, from Old Saxon niuwi, from Proto-Germanic *niwjaz, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos(new). Compare Dutch nieuw, West Frisian nij, English new, German neu.

Alternative forms 2[edit]

ni, nie, nige, nig

Adjective[edit]

nee ‎(comparative ne'er, superlative neest)

  1. new

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nee

  1. Alternative form of neen

Navajo[edit]

Postposition[edit]

nee

  1. with you, by means of you

Inflection[edit]