nat

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See also: Nat, NAT, nať, nät, nǟt, Nät, nåt, and Nat.

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

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Borrowing from Burmese နတ် (nat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nat (plural nats)

  1. A spirit in Burmese mythology, whose cult is followed alongside Buddhism.
    • 1936, Rollo Ahmed, The Black Art, London: Long, page 175:
      They greatly dread evil "Nats" or spirits, to whom they attribute every possible misfortune or illness.

Etymology 2[edit]

Reduced form of naught.

Adverb[edit]

nat (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Not. [14th-17th c.]
    • 1614, William Browne, The Shepheard's Pipe:
      And he a pistle rowned in her eare, / Nat what I want, for I ne came nat there.

Etymology 3[edit]

Abbreviation of natural logarithm.

Noun[edit]

nat (plural nats)

  1. A logarithmic unit of information or entropy, based on natural logarithms.
Synonyms[edit]
See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nātus (born). Compare Romanian nat (personal, individual).

Noun[edit]

nat m

  1. child

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan nat, from Latin nātus, from earlier gnātus, from Proto-Italic *gnātos, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵn̥h₁tós (begotten, produced), derived from the root *ǵenh₁- (to beget, give birth).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nat (feminine nada, masculine plural nats, feminine plural nades)

  1. born
    Synonym: nascut

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Danish nat, from Old Norse nátt, nótt, from Proto-Germanic *nahts, from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nat c (singular definite natten, plural indefinite nætter)

  1. night (period between sunset and sunrise)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch nat, from Old Dutch nat, from Proto-Germanic *nataz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɑt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: nat
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Adjective[edit]

nat (comparative natter, superlative natst)

  1. wet

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of nat
uninflected nat
inflected natte
comparative natter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial nat natter het natst
het natste
indefinite m./f. sing. natte nattere natste
n. sing. nat natter natste
plural natte nattere natste
definite natte nattere natste
partitive nats natters

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Berbice Creole Dutch: nati
  • Negerhollands: nat
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: nat

Noun[edit]

nat n (uncountable)

  1. moisture

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

nat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of

Maia[edit]

Noun[edit]

nat

  1. rain

Middle English[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nat

  1. Alternative form of not
    • 13??, Geoffrey Chaucer, Boethius and Troilus
      And at the laste, yif that any wight wene a thing to ben other weyes thanne it is, it is nat only unscience, but it is deceivable opinioun ful diverse and fer fro the sothe of science.

Noun[edit]

nat

  1. Alternative form of not

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

nāt

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of nytan

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nátt, from Proto-Germanic *nahts.

Noun[edit]

nāt f

  1. night

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nātus, from earlier gnātus, from Proto-Italic *gnātos, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵn̥h₁tós (begotten, produced), derived from the root *ǵenh₁- (to beget, give birth). The meaning in Romanian developed from that of "offspring" or "progeny" in relation to the parent. Compare Aromanian nat (child), also Occitan nada (girl).

Noun[edit]

nat m (plural nați)

  1. (uncommon, popular) person, individual
  2. (uncommon, popular) kinsman, relative

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Singpho[edit]

Noun[edit]

nat

  1. spirit

References[edit]


Tzotzil[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nat

  1. deep
    ti nat uk'umethe deep stream

Related terms[edit]

(Verbs)

(Adjectives)

(Adjectives & Nouns)

References[edit]


Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English not.

Adverb[edit]

nat

  1. not

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith