lamia

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See also: Lamia, lamía, làmia, and lâmia

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lamia, from Ancient Greek Λάμια (Lámia).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lamia (plural lamias or lamiae)

  1. A monster preying upon human beings and who sucked the blood of children, often described as having the head and breasts of a woman and the lower half of a serpent.
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069:, III.2.1.i:
      Apollonius [] by some probable conjectures, found her out to be a serpent, a lamia, and that all her furniture was like Tantalus' gold described by Homer, no substance, but mere illusions.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Λάμια (Lámia).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lamia f (genitive lamiae); first declension

  1. witch who was said to suck children's blood (sort of female bogeyman), a sorceress, enchantress
  2. sort of flatfish
  3. species of owl

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative lamia lamiae
genitive lamiae lamiārum
dative lamiae lamiīs
accusative lamiam lamiās
ablative lamiā lamiīs
vocative lamia lamiae

Usage notes[edit]

  • Elsewhere used to refer to a type of flatfish and a type of owl.

References[edit]

  • lamia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lamia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “lamia”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • lamia” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • lamia in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • lamia in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lamia in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • lamia in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly