herre

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See also: herré

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herri, herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr ‎(noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior ‎(elder). The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz ‎(grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hɛrə/, [ˈhæɐ̯ɐ]

Noun[edit]

herre c (singular definite herren, plural indefinite herrer)

  1. gentleman
  2. lord
  3. master
  4. partner

Inflection[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herri, herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr ‎(noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior ‎(elder).[1] The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz ‎(grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

herre m ‎(definite singular herren, indefinite plural herrer, definite plural herrene)

  1. gentleman, man
    Han kler seg som en virkelig herre.
    He dresses like a real gentleman.
  2. master, lord, ruler
    Knut den mektige var herre over Norge på 1000-tallet.
    Cnut the Great was ruler of Norway in the the 11th century.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hjalmar Falk and Alf Torp, Etymologisk ordbog over det norske og det danske sprog, 1903–06, p. 286.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herri, herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr ‎(noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior ‎(elder).[1]

Noun[edit]

herre m ‎(definite singular herren, indefinite plural herrar, definite plural herrane)

  1. gentleman, man
    Mine damer og herrar!
    Ladies and gentlemen!
  2. master, lord, ruler

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herri, herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr ‎(noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior ‎(elder).[2] The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz ‎(grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

herre c

  1. a man, a gentleman
    mina damer och herrar
    my ladies and gentlemen
    I fjol så gick jag med herrarna i hagen
    Last year I went with the men to the grove (drinking song)
  2. a lord, a master
    Ingen kan tjäna två herrar
    No man can serve two masters (Matthew 6:24)
  3. (when capitalized: Herren) The Lord
    HERREN är min herde, mig skall intet fattas
    The LORD [is] my shepherd; I shall not want. (Psalms 23:1)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hjalmar Falk and Alf Torp, Etymologisk ordbog over det norske og det danske sprog, 1903–06, p. 286.
  2. ^ Hjalmar Falk and Alf Torp, Etymologisk ordbog over det norske og det danske sprog, 1903–06, p. 286.