herre

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See also: herré

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herri, herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder). The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hɛrə/, [ˈhæɐ̯ɐ]

Noun[edit]

herre c (singular definite herren, plural indefinite herrer)

  1. gentleman
  2. lord
  3. master
  4. partner

Inflection[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herri, herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder).[1] The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

herre m (definite singular herren, indefinite plural herrer, definite plural herrene)

  1. gentleman, man
    Han kler seg som en virkelig herre.
    He dresses like a real gentleman.
  2. master, lord, ruler
    Knut den mektige var herre over Norge på 1000-tallet.
    Cnut the Great was ruler of Norway in the the 11th century.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hjalmar Falk and Alf Torp, Etymologisk ordbog over det norske og det danske sprog, 1903–06, p. 286.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herri, herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder).[1]

Noun[edit]

herre m (definite singular herren, indefinite plural herrar, definite plural herrane)

  1. gentleman, man
    Mine damer og herrar!
    Ladies and gentlemen!
  2. master, lord, ruler

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herri, herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder).[2] The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

herre c

  1. a man, a gentleman
    mina damer och herrar
    my ladies and gentlemen
    I fjol så gick jag med herrarna i hagen
    Last year I went with the men to the grove (drinking song)
  2. a lord, a master
    Ingen kan tjäna två herrar
    No man can serve two masters (Matthew 6:24)
  3. (when capitalized: Herren) The Lord
    HERREN är min herde, mig skall intet fattas
    The LORD [is] my shepherd; I shall not want. (Psalms 23:1)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hjalmar Falk and Alf Torp, Etymologisk ordbog over det norske og det danske sprog, 1903–06, p. 286.
  2. ^ Hjalmar Falk and Alf Torp, Etymologisk ordbog over det norske og det danske sprog, 1903–06, p. 286.