harr

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

harr (plural harrs)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) A sea mist
    • 1848, William Davidson, “Observations on the Climate of Largs”, in Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal[1], volume 69, Arran, pages 39-40:
      Fogs and harrs are unfrequent, as are constant rain; mornings of drenching flood being often succeeded by bright and beautiful days.
    • 1890, Sarah Tytler, “An Easterly Harr”, in Pot pourri of gifts literary and artistic[2], page 79:
      The harr clung in a close, white drapery to trees; it swallowed up houses ; it obliterated hills.
    • 2007, Colin Simms, Gyrfalcon Poems[3], →ISBN, page 69:
      The eye rubs faintly in the fell fog, is misled by hill mist the high front coming with the Atlantic storm or the harr on the North Sea roke when there's even no moon and no star tempting to say we see him as often as ..... aurora ...
  2. (Scotland) A wind from the east
    • 1812, William Tennant, Anster Fair, a Poem[4], 1838 Chambers ed. edition, page 8:
      For lo! now peeping just above the vast / Vault of the German Sea, in east afar, / Appears full many a brig's and schooner's mast, / Their topsails strutting with the vernal harr
Alternative forms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Fog sense often used in British English literature

References[edit]

  • 1880, John Jamieson, An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, page 489
  • 1961, edited by Joseph Wright, The English Dialect Dictionary: Being the Complete Vocabulary of All Dialect ..., Vol. 3, page 5
    A northern harr Brings fine weather from far'; n.Yks.* e.Yks. MARSHALL Rur. Econ. ... The harr was very heavy in the marshes this mornin' (THR). 2.
  • 2005, Bill Griffiths, A Dictionary of North East Dialect - page 80
    ... "hare or harr - a mist or thick fog" Brockett Newc & Nth 1829; "harr - a strong fog or wet mist, almost verging on a drizzle" Atkinson Cleve 1868;

Etymology 2[edit]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

harr (plural harrs)

  1. (carpentry) The stile that bears the hinges of a gate.
    • 1987, Paul Nooncree Hasluck, “Gates and Rough Fencing”, in The Handyman's Book: Tools, Materials and Processes Employed in Woodworking[5], →ISBN, page 375:
      One of the first places for a gate to go rotten is at the junction of the brace and harr.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *skarna, from *skera. Cognate with Gothic us-skarjan (us-skarjan, to tear out), Lithuanian skiriù.[1] More at shqerr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

harr (first-person singular past tense harra, participle harrë)

  1. to weed (out), prune, rid (of branches)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (2000) A Concise Historical Grammar of the Albanian Language, Leiden: Brill, page 187

Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German hera. Cognate with German her.

Adverb[edit]

harr

  1. (Uri) to here, hither

References[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

harr

  1. Imperative singular of harren.

Low German[edit]

Verb[edit]

harr

  1. first-person singular past of hebben

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Noun[edit]

harr m (definite singular harren, indefinite plural harrer, definite plural harrene)

  1. (zoology) grayling, Thymallus thymallus

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Noun[edit]

harr m (definite singular harren, indefinite plural harrar, definite plural harrane)

  1. (zoology) grayling, Thymallus thymallus

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Noun[edit]

harr c

  1. grayling (Thymallus thymallus)

Declension[edit]

Declension of harr 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative harr harren harrar harrarna
Genitive harrs harrens harrars harrarnas

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse herri, herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old High German hēriro, hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

harr m

  1. master, lord, ruler

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hǫrr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

harr m

  1. grayling (Thymallus thymallus)