bunting

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See also: Bunting

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Bunting on display for day 3 of the 2012 Olympic torch relay, in Devon, UK
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Possibly from dialect bunting (sifting flour), from Middle English bonten (to sift), hence the material used for that purpose. Possibly from Germanic bundt (to bind or tie together).

Noun[edit]

bunting (countable and uncountable, plural buntings)

  1. Strips of material used as festive decoration, especially in the colours of the national flag.
  2. (nautical) A thin cloth of woven wool from which flags are made; it is light enough to spread in a gentle wind but resistant to fraying in a strong wind.
  3. Flags considered as a group.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

A black-headed bunting (Emberiza melanocephala)
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From Middle English bunting, bountyng, buntynge (also as Middle English buntyle), of uncertain origin. Possibly a reference to speckled plumage, from an unrecorded Middle English *bunt (spotted, speckled, pied) akin to Dutch bont, Middle Low German bunt, bont, German bunt (multi-coloured) +‎ -ing (diminutive suffix).[1]

Noun[edit]

bunting (plural buntings)

  1. Any of various songbirds, mostly of the genus Emberiza, having short bills and brown or gray plumage.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

bunting

  1. present participle of bunt

Noun[edit]

bunting (countable and uncountable, plural buntings)

  1. A pushing action.
  2. A strong timber; a stout prop.
  3. (obsolete) An old boys' game, played with sticks and a small piece of wood.

References[edit]

  1. ^ bunting” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.