bunny

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bune (hollow stalk or stem, drinking straw), from Old English bune (cup, beaker, drinking vessel; reed, cane), of unknown origin. Related to English bun, boon (the stalk of flax or hemp less the fibre), Scots bune, boon, been, see bun, boon. Compare also bunweed.

Noun[edit]

bunny (plural bunnies)

  1. (Britain dialectal) A culvert or short covered drain connecting two ditches.
  2. (Britain dialectal) A chine or gully formed by water running over the edge of a cliff; a wooded glen or small ravine opening through the cliff line to the sea.
    • 1983, Geoffrey Morley, Smuggling in Hampshire and Dorset, 1700-1850 (page 72)
      Friar's Cliff and Highcliffe have always been what the second name suggests: cliffs too high to scale easily and with no convenient bunnies, chines or combes.
  3. (Britain dialectal) Any small drain or culvert.
  4. (Britain dialectal) A brick arch or wooden bridge, covered with earth across a drawn or carriage in a water-meadow, just wide enough to allow a hay-wagon to pass over.
  5. (Britain dialectal) A small pool of water.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English bony, boni (swelling, tumor), from Old French bugne, buigne (swelling, lump), from Old Frankish *bungjo (swelling, bump), from Proto-Germanic *bungô, *bunkô (lump, clump, heap, crowd). More at bunion, bunch.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bunny (plural bunnies)

  1. (Britain dialectal) A swelling from a blow; a bump.
  2. (mining) A sudden enlargement or mass of ore, as opposed to a vein or lode.

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably from bun (rabbit) +‎ -y, though ulterior origin unknown. Together with rabbit, has largely displaced its rhyme coney.

Noun[edit]

bunny (plural bunnies)

  1. A rabbit, especially a juvenile.
  2. A bunny girl: a nightclub waitress who wears a costume having rabbit ears and tail.
  3. (sports) In basketball, an easy shot (i.e., one right next to the bucket) that is missed.
  4. (South Africa) Bunny chow; a snack of bread filled with curry.
    • 2008, Steve Pike, Surfing South Africa, page 258:
      Surfers from Durban grew up on bunnies. You get the curry in the bread with the removed square chunk, used to dunk back in the curry.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bunny (comparative bunnier, superlative bunniest)

  1. (skiing) Easy or unchallenging.
    Let’s start on the bunny slope.
    • 2014, Carey Heywood, Sawyer Says: A Companion Novel to Him and Her, ISBN 0991436229:
      We are on the bunniest of bunny hills. I've fallen no fewer than six times and I love every minute of it.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From bun (small bread roll) +‎ -y.

Adjective[edit]

bunny (comparative more bunny or bunnier, superlative most bunny or bunniest)

  1. (rare, humorous) Resembling a bun (small bread roll). [since the 1960s, but always rare]
    • 2012, Sue Simkins, Cooking With Mrs Simkins, ISBN 184803475X:
      If you would like to make some buns with more of a Chelsea bunlike texture follow the recipe above, but increase the flour to 300g (11oz). This will make them less rich and more 'bunny'.
    • 2014, Bruce Montague, Wedding Bells and Chimney Sweeps, ISBN 1784180424:
      Before the interregnum, the cakes made for weddings had been pathetic offerings, consisting mainly of piles of biscuits and scones. When you read the list of ingredients -- sugar, eggs, milk, flour, currents, and spices -- these must have looked and tasted a lot like hot cross buns, but without being hot, without the cross, and without being particularly bunny.
Synonyms[edit]