arch

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See also: ARCH, ärch, arch-, -arch, and arch.

English[edit]

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arch (3).

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English arch, arche, from Old French arche (an arch) (French arche), a feminine form of arc, from Latin arcus (a bow, arc, arch).

Noun[edit]

arch (plural arches)

  1. An inverted U shape.
  2. An arch-shaped arrangement of trapezoidal stones, designed to redistribute downward force outward.
  3. (architecture) An architectural element having the shape of an arch
  4. Any place covered by an arch; an archway.
    to pass into the arch of a bridge
  5. (archaic, geometry) An arc; a part of a curve.
  6. A natural arch-shaped opening in a rock mass.
  7. (anatomy) Curved part of the bottom of a foot.
Derived terms[edit]
Terms derived from arch
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.
References[edit]

Verb[edit]

arch (third-person singular simple present arches, present participle arching, simple past and past participle arched)

  1. To form into an arch shape
    The cat arched its back
  2. To cover with an arch or arches.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the prefix arch-. "Principal" is the original sense; "mischievous" is via onetime frequent collocation with rogue, knave, etc.

Adjective[edit]

arch (comparative archer, superlative archest)

  1. Knowing, clever, mischievous.
    I attempted to hide my emotions, but an arch remark escaped my lips.
    • (Can we date this quote by Tatler and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      [He] spoke his request with so arch a leer.
    • 1906, O. Henry, By Courier:
      A certain melancholy that touched her countenance must have been of recent birth, for it had not yet altered the fine and youthful contours of her cheek, nor subdued the arch though resolute curve of her lips.
    • 1912 January, Zane Grey, chapter 3, in Riders of the Purple Sage: A Novel, New York, N.Y.; London: Harper & Brothers Publishers, OCLC 6868219:
      Lassiter ended there with dry humor, yet behind that was meaning. Jane blushed and made arch eyes at him.
  2. Principal; primary.
    They were arch enemies.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

arch (plural arches)

  1. (obsolete) A chief.

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

arch m inan

  1. sheet (in printing)

Declension[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *arg, from Proto-Germanic *argaz.

Adjective[edit]

arch

  1. bad, depraved
  2. wrong, evil
  3. shameful
  4. bad, worthless, of low quality
Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Dutch: arg, erg

Etymology 2[edit]

Substantive form of the adjective arch.

Noun[edit]

arch n

  1. evil
  2. disaster, misfortune
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading[edit]


Middle Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the root of erchi (to request), from Proto-Celtic *ɸarsketi, from Proto-Indo-European *preḱ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arch f

  1. request

Verb[edit]

arch

  1. second-person singular imperative of erchi

Mutation[edit]

Middle Welsh mutation
Radical Soft Nasal H-prothesis
arch unchanged unchanged harch
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin arca.

Noun[edit]

arch f (plural eirch)

  1. (obsolete) chest, coffer
  2. coffin (box for the dead)
  3. ark (large boat with a flat bottom)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from erchi (to seek, to ask for).

Noun[edit]

arch f (plural eirchion)

  1. request, command
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Inflected form of erchi (to seek, to ask for).

Verb[edit]

arch

  1. second-person singular imperative of erchi

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
arch unchanged unchanged harch
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “arch”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies