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U+D55C, 한
HANGUL SYLLABLE HAN
Composition: + +
Dubeolsik input:g-k-s

[U+D55B]
Hangul Syllables
[U+D55D]




피 ←→ 해

Korean[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Korean ᄒᆞᆫ (hòn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?han
Revised Romanization (translit.)?han
McCune–Reischauer?han
Yale Romanization?han

Numeral[edit]

Korean numbers (edit)
10
1 2  → [a], [b]
    Native: 하나 (hana), (han)
    Sino-Korean: (il)
    Hanja:
    Ordinal: 첫째 (cheotjjae)
    Number of days: 하루 (haru)

(han)

  1. one (as a determiner numeral before a noun or classifier)
    마리 날아간다.
    Sae han mariga naraganda.
    A bird is flying away.
    Synonyms: 하나 (hana, one, nominal numeral), 일(一) (il, one, Sino-Korean numeral)
Usage notes[edit]

In modern Korean, numbers are usually written in Arabic numerals.

The Korean language has two sets of numerals: a native set of numerals inherited from Old Korean, and a Sino-Korean set which was borrowed from Middle Chinese in the first millennium C.E.

Native classifiers take native numerals.

Some Sino-Korean classifiers take native numerals, others take Sino-Korean numerals, while yet others take both.

Recently loaned classifiers generally take Sino-Korean numerals.

For many terms, a native numeral has a quantifying sense, whereas a Sino-Korean numeral has a sense of labeling.

  • 반(班) (se ban, three school classes, native numeral)
  • 반(班) (sam ban, Class Number Three, Sino-Korean numeral)

When used in isolation, native numerals refer to objects of that number and are used in counting and quantifying, whereas Sino-Korean numerals refer to the numbers in a more mathematical sense.

  • 하나 주세요 (hanaman deo juseyo, Could you give me just one more, please, native numeral)
  • 더하기 ? (Il deohagi ireun?, What's one plus one?, Sino-Korean numeral)

While older stages of Korean had native numerals up to the thousands, native numerals currently exist only up to ninety-nine, and Sino-Korean is used for all higher numbers. There is also a tendency—particularly among younger speakers—to uniformly use Sino-Korean numerals for the higher tens as well, so that native numerals such as 일흔 (ilheun, “seventy”) or 아흔 (aheun, “ninety”) are becoming less common.

Determiner[edit]

(han)

  1. (before a numeral) about, around
    Synonym: 대략(大略) (daeryak)

Etymology 2[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Sino-Korean word from , from the Middle Korean reading ᄒᆞᆫ (Yale: hon).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ha̠(ː)n]
  • Phonetic hangeul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, the great majority of speakers (in both Koreas) no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?han
Revised Romanization (translit.)?han
McCune–Reischauer?han
Yale Romanization?hān

Noun[edit]

(han) (hanja )

  1. deep-seated resentment
    맺히다hani maechidato have a deep-seated resentment
Usage notes[edit]

Koreans use the character differently from any of their neighbors to mean the “virtuous, patient endurance of injustice” or “emotional longing for justice.” If one analyzes the pairings with other characters and usage in the original Chinese or Japanese, the meaning is much more negative, as in “holding” or “avenging” a grudge.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Sino-Korean word from , from the Middle Korean reading (Yale: han).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ha̠(ː)n]
  • Phonetic hangeul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, the great majority of speakers (in both Koreas) no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?han
Revised Romanization (translit.)?han
McCune–Reischauer?han
Yale Romanization?hān

Proper noun[edit]

(Han) (hanja )

  1. Short for 한국(韓國) (Han-guk, Korea, the Republic of Korea).
  2. A surname​.
  3. (historical) Han (ancient Chinese county, viscounty, and kingdom of the Zhou dynasty)
    Synonym: 한(韓)나라 (Hannara)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Sino-Korean word from , from the Middle Korean reading (Yale: han).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ha̠(ː)n]
  • Phonetic hangeul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, the great majority of speakers (in both Koreas) no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?han
Revised Romanization (translit.)?han
McCune–Reischauer?han
Yale Romanization?hān

Proper noun[edit]

(Han) (hanja )

  1. (historical) Han dynasty
    Synonym: 한(漢)나라 (Hannara)
  2. A surname​.
Derived terms[edit]

Suffix[edit]

—한 (-han) (hanja )

  1. (dated, often negative) man; person
    문외 (門外)munoehanan outsider
    냉혈 (冷血)naenghyeolhana heartless man
    호색 (好色)hosaekhana lecherous man
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Sino-Korean word from , from the Middle Korean reading ᄒᆞᆫ (Yale: hon).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ha̠(ː)n]
  • Phonetic hangeul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, the great majority of speakers (in both Koreas) no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?han
Revised Romanization (translit.)?han
McCune–Reischauer?han
Yale Romanization?hān

Noun[edit]

(han) (hanja )

  1. limit; end; bound
    그것 이다.
    Geugeosi hanida.
    That is the limit.
  2. being as long as; being as far as
    알고 있는 , ...
    Naega algo inneun han, ...
    As far as I've been informed ...
  3. a word used to indicate that the extent of what is referred to in the preceding statement is beyond measure
  4. a word used to indicate a situation in which one is expected to sacrifice oneself for a certain task or endure a difficult and painful circumstance
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]