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U+C77C, 일
HANGUL SYLLABLE IL
Composition: + +

[U+C77B]
Hangul Syllables
[U+C77D]




의 ←→ 자

Jeju[edit]

Jeju numbers (edit)
10
1 2  → 
    Native isol.: ᄒᆞ나 (hawna)
    Native attr.: ᄒᆞᆫ (hawn)
    Sino: (il)
    Ordinal: 첫체 (cheotche)
    Number of days: ᄒᆞ루 (hawru), ᄒᆞ를 (hawreul), ᄒᆞ르 (hawreu)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

(il)

  1. work, job
  2. business
  3. matter, affair, concern

Etymology 2[edit]

Sino-Korean word from .

Numeral[edit]

(il)

  1. one
    Synonym: ᄒᆞ나 (hawna)

Korean[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

First attested in the Yongbi eocheonga (龍飛御天歌 / 용비어천가), 1447, as Middle Korean 일〯 (Yale: ǐl), related to Middle Korean 일〯다〮 (Yale: ǐl-tá, “to occur, to arise”).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [i(ː)ɭ]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?il
Revised Romanization (translit.)?il
McCune–Reischauer?il
Yale Romanization?īl
  • South Gyeongsang (Busan) pitch accent: / 일 / 일까지

    Syllables in red take high pitch. This word always takes low pitch, and heightens the pitch of two subsequent suffixed syllables.

Noun[edit]

(il)

  1. work (activity done for compensation or reward)
    회사에서 혹시 어떤 하세요?
    Hoesa-eseo hoksi eotteon il haseyo?
    Excuse me, what work do you do in the company?
  2. a fact, an event, a situation (any kind of occurrence)
    무슨 이야?Museun ir-iya?What's the matter?
    이런 있을 몰랐다.
    Ireon ir-i isseul jur-eun mollatda.
    I didn't know something like this would happen.
    옛날 생각하니 슬프다.
    Yennal ir-eul saenggakhani seulpeuda.
    It's sad to think about my old circumstances.
  3. deed (any human activity)
    착한 해야지.Chakhan ir-eul haeyaji.You need to do good things.
  4. (euphemistic) urination, defecation, sexual intercourse
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Sino-Korean word from (one). From Middle Korean 일〮 (Yale: íl).

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?il
Revised Romanization (translit.)?il
McCune–Reischauer?il
Yale Romanization?il
  • South Gyeongsang (Busan) pitch accent: / /

    Syllables in red take high pitch. This word always takes high pitch and also heightens the next suffixed syllable.

Numeral[edit]

Korean numbers (edit)
10
[a], [b], [c] ←  0 1 2  → 
    Native isol.: 하나 (hana)
    Native attr.: (han)
    Sino-Korean: (il)
    Hanja:
    Ordinal: 첫째 (cheotjjae)

(il) (hanja )

  1. one
Usage notes[edit]

In modern Korean, numbers are usually written in Arabic numerals.

The Korean language has two sets of numerals: a native set of numerals inherited from Old Korean, and a Sino-Korean set which was borrowed from Middle Chinese in the first millennium C.E.

Native classifiers take native numerals.

Some Sino-Korean classifiers take native numerals, others take Sino-Korean numerals, while yet others take both.

Recently loaned classifiers generally take Sino-Korean numerals.

For many terms, a native numeral has a quantifying sense, whereas a Sino-Korean numeral has a sense of labeling.

  • 반(班) (se ban, three school classes, native numeral)
  • 반(班) (sam ban, Class Number Three, Sino-Korean numeral)

When used in isolation, native numerals refer to objects of that number and are used in counting and quantifying, whereas Sino-Korean numerals refer to the numbers in a more mathematical sense.

  • 하나 주세 (hana-man deo juse-yo, Could you give me just one more, please, native numeral)
  • 더하기 ? (Il deohagi ir-eun?, What's one plus one?, Sino-Korean numeral)

While older stages of Korean had native numerals up to the thousands, native numerals currently exist only up to ninety-nine, and Sino-Korean is used for all higher numbers. There is also a tendency—particularly among younger speakers—to uniformly use Sino-Korean numerals for the higher tens as well, so that native numerals such as 일흔 (ilheun, “seventy”) or 아흔 (aheun, “ninety”) are becoming less common.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Sino-Korean word from (sun; day).

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?il
Revised Romanization (translit.)?il
McCune–Reischauer?il
Yale Romanization?il

Noun[edit]

(il) (hanja )

  1. day (twenty-four hours, a thirtieth of the month)
    3 동안 여행하다
    samil dong'an yeohaenghada
    to travel for three days
  2. Short for 일요일(日曜日) (iryoil, Sunday).

Proper noun[edit]

(Il) (hanja )

  1. Short for 일본(日本) (Ilbon, Japan).
Usage notes[edit]
  • In news headlines, this is customarily written solely in the hanja form, even in contemporary Korean texts otherwise devoid of Chinese characters.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Korean reading of various Chinese characters.

Syllable[edit]

(il)

Extended content
  1. : one
    (eumhun reading: 하나 (hana il))
    (MC reading: (MC ʔiɪt̚))
  2. : day
    (eumhun reading: (nal il))
    (MC reading: (MC ȵiɪt̚))
  3. :
    (MC reading: (MC jiɪt̚))
  4. :
    (MC reading: (MC jiɪt̚))
  5. :
    (MC reading: (MC jiɪt̚))
  6. :
    (MC reading: (MC ȵiɪt̚))
  7. :
    (MC reading: (MC jiɪt̚))
  8. :
    (MC reading: (MC jiɪt̚))
  9. :
    (MC reading: (MC ʔiɪt̚))
  10. :
    (MC reading: (MC jiɪt̚))
  11. :
    (MC reading: (MC jiɪt̚))
  12. :
    (MC reading: (MC jiɪt̚))
  13. 𨓜: Alternative form of
  14. :
    (MC reading: (MC ɕiɪt̚))
  15. :
    (MC reading: (MC -))
  16. :
    (MC reading: (MC ɳˠiɪt̚))
  17. :
    (MC reading: (MC ɳˠiɪt̚))
  18. :
    (MC reading: (MC jiɪt̚))
  19. :
    (MC reading: )
  20. :
    (MC reading: )
  21. :
    (MC reading: (MC ȵiɪt̚))
  22. :
    (MC reading: (MC ɳˠiɪt̚))
  23. :
    (MC reading: (MC ȵiɪt̚, ɳˠiɪt̚))
  24. :
  25. :
    (MC reading: (MC -))
  26. :
    (MC reading: )
  27. :
    (MC reading: )
  28. 䭿:
    (MC reading: 䭿 (MC jiɪt̚))
  29. :
    (MC reading: )

References[edit]

  1. ^ Samuel Elmo Martin (2000) Consonant Lenition in Korean and the Macro-Altaic Question, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, →ISBN

Middle Korean[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

일〯 (ǐl)

  1. work, job
Descendants[edit]
  • Korean: (il)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Chinese (MC ʔiɪt̚).

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

일〮 (íl)

  1. one
    Synonym: ᄒᆞ낳〮 (hònáh)
Descendants[edit]