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U+AC1C, 개
HANGUL SYLLABLE GAE
Composition: +
Dubeolsik input:r-o

[U+AC1B]
Hangul Syllables
[U+AC1D]




가 ←→ 갸

Korean[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

First attested in the Jīlín lèishì (鷄林類事 / 계림유사), 1103, as Late Old Korean 家稀.

In the Hangul script, first attested in the Worin cheongangjigok (月印千江之曲 / 월인천강지곡), 1449, as Middle Korean 가히〮 (Yale: kàhí), and subsequently recorded as 개〯 (Yale: kǎy) in the 16th century, after the h has dropped.[1]

The prefix derives from the noun. Compare English bitch.

A dog (a Labrador)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [kɛ(ː)] ~ [ke̞(ː)]
  • Phonetic hangeul: [(ː)/(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, the great majority of speakers (in both Koreas) no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gae
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gae
McCune–Reischauer?kae
Yale Romanization?kāy
  • South Gyeongsang (Busan) pitch accent: / 개 / 개까지

    Syllables in red take high pitch. This word always takes low pitch, and heightens the pitch of two subsequent suffixed syllables.

Noun[edit]

(gae) (counter 마리)

  1. dog
    Synonym: 견공(犬公) (gyeon-gong)
  2. (figuratively) someone who does the bidding of another
Usage notes[edit]

Some younger speakers prefer 강아지 (gang-aji, puppy) to refer to dogs of any age, to avoid the vulgar connotations of the prefix.

Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Prefix[edit]

개— (gae-)

  1. (vulgar, slang) fucking (as an intensifier)
    진짜 좋다.Jinjja gaejota.It's really fucking good.
    진짜 쩐다!Jinjja gaejjeonda!It's really fucking amazing!
  2. wild; worthless; of inferior quality
Usage notes[edit]

The prefix traditionally has a disparaging meaning only, but in modern slang it is used as a general vulgar intensifier regardless of the semantics involved.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Sino-Korean word from (classifier for people or objects).

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gae
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gae
McCune–Reischauer?kae
Yale Romanization?kay

Counter[edit]

(gae) (hanja //)

  1. item, piece (general counter for objects)
    필요해요?
    Myeot gae piryohaeyo?
    How many (things) do you need?
    사과
    sagwa se gae
    Three apples
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

First attested in the Bullyu dugongbu si eonhae (分類杜工部詩諺解 / 분류두공부시언해), 1481, as Middle Korean 개〮 (Yale: káy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gae
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gae
McCune–Reischauer?kae
Yale Romanization?kay

Noun[edit]

(gae)

  1. estuary
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Of native Korean origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gae
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gae
McCune–Reischauer?kae
Yale Romanization?kay

Suffix[edit]

—개 (-gae)

  1. an agentive suffix

Etymology 5[edit]

Korean reading of various Chinese characters.

Syllable[edit]

(gae)

Extended content
  1. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʌiX))
  2. :
    (MC reading: (MC kˠɛi))
  3. :
    (MC reading: (MCH))
  4. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰʌi))
  5. :
    (MC reading: (MC kˠɛiH))
  6. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰʌiH))
  7. :
    (MC reading: )
  8. :
    (MC reading: (MC kɑiH))
  9. :
    (MC reading: (MC kˠɛiH))
  10. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰʌiX))
  11. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰʌiX))
  12. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʌiH))
  13. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰʌiX))
  14. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰʌiH))
  15. :
    (MC reading: (MC kˠɛiH))
  16. :
    (MC reading: (MC kˠɛiH))
  17. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰɨiX))
  18. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰʌiX, kʰʌiH))
  19. :
    (MC reading: (MC kˠɛiH))
  20. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʌi))
  21. :
    (MC reading: (MC kɑiH))
  22. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰˠɛi, kʰˠɛiH))
  23. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʌiH))
  24. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰɑiH))
  25. :
    (MC reading: (MC kʰʌiX, kʰʌiH))
  26. :
    (MC reading: (MC kɑiH))
  27. : Alternative form of
  28. : Alternative form of
  29. : Alternative form of

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lee, Ki-Moon; Ramsey, S. Robert, A History of the Korean Language, Cambridge University Press, 2011, →ISBN, page 163–164