frank

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Frank

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English frank, from Old French franc (free), in turn from the name of an early Germanic confederation, the Franks, from Proto-West Germanic *frank (courageous, free) and/or Proto-West Germanic *frankō (javelin, spear).

Adjective[edit]

frank (comparative franker, superlative frankest)

  1. honest, especially in a manner that seems slightly blunt; candid; not reserved or disguised.
    May I be frank with you?
  2. (medicine) unmistakable, clinically obvious, self-evident
    The research probes whether treating pre-diabetes with metformin can prevent progression to frank diabetes.
  3. (obsolete) Unbounded by restrictions, limitations, etc.; free.
  4. (obsolete) Liberal; generous; profuse.
  5. (obsolete, derogatory) Unrestrained; loose; licentious.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

frank (plural franks)

  1. (uncountable) Free postage, a right exercised by governments (usually with definite article).
    • October 5, 1780, William Cowper, letter to Rev. William Unwin
      I have said so much, that, if I had not a frank, I must burn my letter and begin again.
  2. (countable) The notice on an envelope where a stamp would normally be found.
    • 1842, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Lady Anne Granard, volume 2, pages 178-179:
      But, although her friends were kind, Lady Anne was not easy; neither daughter made her appearance, nor did she receive a letter to account for their silence. She remembered, indeed, that Charles Penrhyn could not get franks now, and her daughters knew she would not pay postage; and she had commanded Helen to work night and day, saying, "surely they can give her common materials."

Verb[edit]

US franking mark

frank (third-person singular simple present franks, present participle franking, simple past and past participle franked)

  1. To place a frank on an envelope.
  2. To exempt from charge for postage, as a letter, package, or packet, etc.
  3. To send by public conveyance free of expense.
    • 1850-1859, Charles Dickens, Household Words
      This required extensive correspondence; so, in the next place, the privilege of franking letters in reference to the emigrants' registration office, was obtained—much to the indignation of red tapists.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of frankfurter.

A frank on a bun.

Noun[edit]

frank (plural franks)

  1. A hot dog or sausage.
    Synonyms: frankfurt, frankfurter
    Buy a package of franks for the barbecue.
    • 1957, Jack Kerouac, chapter 1, in On the Road, Viking Press, OCLC 43419454, part 1:
      We had a farewell meal of franks and beans in a Seventh Avenue Riker’s, and then Dean got on the bus that said Chicago and roared off into the night.
    • 1978, Superman: The Movie, spoken by Perry White (Jackie Cooper):
      I want the name of this flying whatchamacallit to go with the Daily Planet like bacon and eggs, franks and beans, death and taxes, politics and corruption!
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

frank (plural franks)

  1. (UK) The grey heron.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old French franc.

Noun[edit]

frank (plural franks)

  1. A pigsty.

Verb[edit]

frank (third-person singular simple present franks, present participle franking, simple past and past participle franked)

  1. To shut up in a frank or sty; to pen up; hence, to cram; to fatten.

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

frank m

  1. franc (former currency of France and some other countries)
  2. franc (any of several units of currency such as Swiss franc)

Further reading[edit]

  • frank in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • frank in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch vranc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

frank (comparative franker, superlative frankst)

  1. frank, candid, blunt, open-hearted
  2. (dated) cheeky, brazen

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of frank
uninflected frank
inflected franke
comparative franker
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial frank franker het frankst
het frankste
indefinite m./f. sing. franke frankere frankste
n. sing. frank franker frankste
plural franke frankere frankste
definite franke frankere frankste
partitive franks frankers

Derived terms[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

German Franc.

Noun[edit]

frank (genitive frangi, partitive franki)

  1. franc
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

frank (genitive frangi, partitive franki)

  1. Frank (Frankish person)
Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German franc, from Old French franc (free), of Germanic but eventually uncertain origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

frank (strong nominative masculine singular franker, not comparable)

  1. (archaic) frank

Usage notes[edit]

  • Now almost exclusively used in the (also somewhat dated) expression frank und frei.

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • frank” in Duden online
  • frank” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French franc, from Middle French franc, from Medieval Latin Franc, from Frankish *Frank. Doublet of Frank.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

frank m anim

  1. franc (former unit of currency of Belgium)
  2. franc (currency of the Comoros)
  3. franc (former unit of currency of France)
  4. franc (currency of Liechtenstein)
  5. franc (former unit of currency of Luxembourg)
  6. franc (former unit of currency of Monaco)
  7. franc (currency of Switzerland)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Related terms[edit]

adjectives
nouns

Further reading[edit]

  • frank in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • frank in Polish dictionaries at PWN