triplex

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See also: Triplex

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin triplex.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

triplex (not comparable)

  1. Having three parts; triple or threefold.
  2. (architecture) Having three floors or other divisions.

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

triplex (countable and uncountable, plural triplexes)

  1. A building with three apartments or divisions
  2. (juggling) A throwing motion where three balls are thrown with one hand at the same time.
  3. (music, uncountable) Triple time.

Verb[edit]

triplex (third-person singular simple present triplexes, present participle triplexing, simple past and past participle triplexed)

  1. (transitive) To make triplex.

Latin[edit]

Latin numbers (edit)
[a], [b] ←  2 III
3
4  → [a], [b]
    Cardinal: trēs
    Ordinal: tertius
    Adverbial: ter
    Multiplier: triplex, triplus
    Distributive: ternī
    Fractional: triens

Etymology[edit]

From trēs (three) + plicō (fold together).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

triplex (genitive triplicis, adverb tripliciter); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. triple, threefold

Declension[edit]

Third-declension one-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative triplex triplicēs triplicia
Genitive triplicis triplicium
Dative triplicī triplicibus
Accusative triplicem triplex triplicēs triplicia
Ablative triplicī triplicibus
Vocative triplex triplicēs triplicia

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • triplex in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • triplex in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • triplex in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • in two, three columns: agmine duplici, triplici
    • to draw up the army in three lines: aciem triplicem instruere (B. G. 1. 24)