communis

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Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Latin comoine[m], *comoenus ‎(shared, general), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱom-moy-n-, from *mey- ‎(to change). Cognate with Old English ġemǣne ‎(common). More at mean.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

commūnis m, f ‎(neuter commūne); third declension

  1. common, ordinary, commonplace, universal
  2. of or for the community, public
  3. democratic; representing the common sentiment
  4. (of manners) familiar, accessible, courteous
  5. (grammar) having both qualities of a subdivided category, such as a verb with both an active and a passive meaning, or a syllable being either long or short.

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative commūnis commūne commūnēs commūnia
genitive commūnis commūnium
dative commūnī commūnibus
accusative commūnem commūne commūnēs commūnia
ablative commūnī commūnibus
vocative commūnis commūne commūnēs commūnia

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • communis in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • communis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • COMMUNIS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • communis in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to considerably (in no way) further the common good: multum (nihil) ad communem utilitatem afferre
    • to accommodate something to the standard of the popular intelligence: ad intellegentiam communem or popularem accommodare aliquid
    • to express oneself in popular language: ad vulgarem sensum or ad communem opinionem orationem accommodare (Off. 2. 10. 35)
    • (ambiguous) we know from experience: usu rerum (vitae, vitae communis) edocti sumus
    • (ambiguous) unanimously: uno, communi, summo or omnium consensu (Tusc. 1. 15. 35)
    • (ambiguous) the ordinary usage of language, everyday speech: communis sermonis consuetudo
    • (ambiguous) to be always considering what people think: multum communi hominum opinioni tribuere