universal

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English universal, from Old French universal (French universel), from Latin universalis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌjuːnɪˈvɜːsl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌjuːnɪˈvɜːɹsl/
  • (file)
    Rhymes: -ɜː(r)səl

Adjective[edit]

universal (comparative more universal, superlative most universal)

  1. Of or pertaining to the universe.
  2. Common to all members of a group or class.
    • 1922, Henry Ford, My Life and Work:
      I had been planning every day through these years toward a universal car.
    • 1911, 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica:
      In Logic, the letter A is used as a symbol for the universal affirmative proposition in the general form "all x is y."
  3. Common to all society; world-wide
    She achieved universal fame.
    • 1760, John Dryden, “The Life of John Dryden, Esq.”, in The Miscellaneous Works of John Dryden, [], volume I, London: Printed for J[acob] and R[ichard] Tonson, [], OCLC 863244003, page xiii:
      [John] Dryden's univerſal genius, his firmly eſtablished reputation, and the glory his memory muſt always reflect upon the nation that gave him birth, make us ardently wiſh for a more accurate life of him than any which has hitherto appeared: []
  4. unlimited; vast; infinite
  5. Useful for many purposes general-purpose, all-purpose
    universal wrench

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Noun[edit]

universal (plural universals)

  1. (philosophy) A characteristic or property that particular things have in common.
    • 1912, Bertrand Russel, The Problems of Philosophy, Chapter 9:
      When we examine common words, we find that, broadly speaking, proper names stand for particulars, while other substantives, adjectives, prepositions, and verbs stand for universals.
    • 1970, John R. Searle, Speech acts[1]:
      We might also distinguish those expressions which are used to refer to individuals or particulars from those which are used to refer to what philosophers have called universals: e.g., to distinguish such expressions as "Everest" and "this chair" from "the number three", "the color red" and "drunkenness".

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Adjective[edit]

universal (masculine and feminine plural universals)

  1. universal

Galician[edit]

Adjective[edit]

universal m, f (plural universais)

  1. of or pertaining to the universe
  2. world-wide, universal, common to all cultures

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

universal (comparative universaler, superlative am universalsten)

  1. universal

Declension[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French universel, from Latin ūniversālis; equivalent to universe +‎ -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /iu̯niˈvɛrsal/, /iu̯nivɛrˈsaːl/, /iu̯niˈvɛrsɛl/

Adjective[edit]

universal

  1. all-encompassing, subject to everything and everyone; having universal significance.
  2. (Late ME) absolute, subject to everything in a given area or subject (e.g. a settlement; a person)
  3. (Late ME) frequently practiced, usual, customary.
  4. (Late ME, rare) Given total leeway and control; with universal power.
  5. (Late ME, rare) unbiased, unprejudiced, nonpolitical
  6. (Late ME, rare) general, non-specific, generic
  7. (Late ME, philosophy, rare) unformed, uncreated, unmade.
  8. (Late ME, philosophy, rare) theoretical, abstract, general.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Noun[edit]

universal

  1. (Late ME, philosophy, rare) A category, class, or classification.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Determiner[edit]

universal

  1. (Late ME) The whole, all of, every portion of, all parts of.
  2. (Late ME, rare) Every kind of; all sorts of

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

universal m (oblique and nominative feminine singular universale)

  1. universal

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin universalis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /u.ni.vɨɾ.ˈsaɫ/
  • Hyphenation: u‧ni‧ver‧sal

Adjective[edit]

universal m, f (plural universais, comparable)

  1. Of or pertaining to the universe; universal.
  2. Common to all society; universal; world-wide.
  3. Common to all members of a group or class; universal.

Inflection[edit]

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:universal.

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

universal (plural universales)

  1. universal

Related terms[edit]