kore

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See also: Kore, korę, köré, köre, kőre, køre, and koere

English[edit]

A reconstruction of a kore

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek κόρη (kórē, girl, maiden).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kore (plural korai or kores)

  1. (art, sculpture) An Ancient Greek statue of a woman, portrayed standing, usually clothed, painted in bright colours and having an elaborate hairstyle.
    • 1966, Spyros Meletzēs, Helenē A. Papadakē, Akropolis and Museum[1], page 42:
      Mus. No 685: Archaic kore of island marble (500-490 B. C.) 4 ft high. Attic work. This kore is not wearing the Ionian smile, but a look of solemn gravity. She does not gather up her robes with the left hand like the other kores, [] .
    • 1995, Irene Bald Romano, University of Pennsylvania Museum, The Terracotta Figurines and Related Vessels[2], page 14:
      Ducat believes that all the kore plastic vessels wearing transverse himatia ending in stepped folds over the abdomen originate in Rhodes (1966: 72).
    • 2002, Matthew Dillon, Girls and Women in Classical Greek Religion[3], page 9:
      Inscribed dedications often took the form of korai (singular: kore): statues, usually life-size or larger of female figures, generally goddesses.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

kore

  1. plural of koor

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *kāsra, from Proto-Indo-European *kars (to scratch, rub). Compare Lithuanian kar̃šti (comb, curry), Latvian kā̀ršu (wool comb), Latin cardus (thistle), Middle High German harsten (become hard, rough).

Noun[edit]

kore f (indefinite plural kore, definite singular korja, definite plural koret)

  1. scrub, crust (of baked products, wounds)

Related terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

koro +‎ -e

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

kore

  1. cordially, heartily
    • 1999, “Kore Bonvenon / Intro”, in Esperanto, performed by Freundeskreis:
      Estu kore bonvenaj por la dua albumo de Amikaro / Sub la titolo “Esperanto”
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek κόρη (kórē, girl, maiden).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkore/, [ˈko̞re̞]
  • Rhymes: -ore
  • Syllabification(key): ko‧re

Noun[edit]

kore

  1. kore (Greek sculpture)

Declension[edit]

Speakers prefer not to inflect this word, and use it only for the nominative singular. If inflection is needed, the term kore-veistos (kore-sculpture) is used instead.

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hausa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kóː.rèː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [kʷóː.rèː]

Adjective[edit]

kōr̃ḕ (feminine kōr̃ìyā, plural kōr̃ā̀yē or kwâr̃r̃ā)

  1. green

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

kore

  1. Rōmaji transcription of これ

Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese correr.

Verb[edit]

kore

  1. to run
  2. to race
  3. to hurry

Latvian[edit]

Noun[edit]

kore f (5th declension)

  1. ridge
  2. gable
  3. comb
  4. crest
Quote-alpha.png This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

Declension[edit]


Maori[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kore

  1. without (not having)

Numeral[edit]

kore

  1. zero

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

kore (present tense korar, past tense kora, past participle kora, passive infinitive korast, present participle korande, imperative kore/kor)

  1. to choir

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese correr and Spanish correr and Kabuverdianu kori and Kabuverdianu kore.

Verb[edit]

kore

  1. to flow
  2. to run

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Verb[edit]

kore (Cyrillic spelling коре)

  1. third-person plural present indicative of koriti

Ternate[edit]

Noun[edit]

kore

  1. wind (real or perceived movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001). A Descriptive Study of the Language of Ternate, the Northern Moluccas, Indonesia. University of Pittsburgh