Deborah

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See also: Déborah

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hebrew דְבוֹרָה (dvorá), meaning bee.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Deborah (plural Deborahs)

  1. A judge of Israel; a nurse of Rebecca.
  2. A female given name, popular from the 1940s to the 1970s, first in the USA, then in the UK.
    • 1851 James Brayshay: The Protector of Houghall, Or the Lily and the Rose. Groombridge and Sons, 1851. Act I:
      Rapier. Heigho! Deborah! it's an ugly name, a damnable name - the name I mean! - it sounds like Gomorrah! Deb! Debby! - worse still - sounded sharp now I rather like it! - Deborah! Deborah! Deborah!
    • 1995 Carl Hiaasen: Stormy Weather. Alfred A.Knopf,Inc. ISBN 0679419829 page 256:
      He hadn't known, for example, that her middle name was Deborah. It was a name he liked: plucky, Midwestern and reliable-sounding. He was willing to bet that if you went through every women's prison in America, you wouldn't find a half-dozen Deborahs.

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