Phryne

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Translingual[edit]

Camera icon.svg This entry needs a photograph or drawing for illustration. Please try to find a suitable image on Wikimedia Commons or upload one there yourself!
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies

Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Proper noun[edit]

Phryne f

  1. (obsolete) A taxonomic genus within the family Brassicaceae.
  2. (obsolete) Bufo, certain frogs.



English[edit]

Phryne before the Areopagus, by Jean-Léon Gérôme, 1861
Phryne, by Gustave Boulanger, 1850

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Φρύνη (Phrúnē), from φρύνη (phrúnē, toad), a nickname often given to prostitutes of the time.

Proper noun[edit]

Phryne

  1. (historical) An Ancient Greek courtesan of the 4th century BC, reputedly the model for Praxiteles' Aphrodite of Cnidus and famously tried for the capital charge of impiety, during which trial she allegedly bared her breasts before the judges.
    • 1797, "Anthony Pasquin" (John Williams), The Pin-Basket to the Children of Thespis: With Notes Historical, Critical and Biographical, page 91,
      The suffrages were recently divided between Mademoiselle Lange and Madame Tallien — the Helen and Phryne of the nation.
    • 1835, Selections from the Edinburgh Review, page 354,
      But in the first of these instances, an impediment may be supposed to be insurmountable, which Dryden has only surmounted by the substitution of matchless beauties of his own! He wins his cause, like Phryne pleading before the Areopagus.
    • 2010, Laura Salah Nasrallah, Christian Responses to Roman Art and Architecture: The Second-Century Church Amid the Spaces of Empire, page 261,
      The Roman-period stories that circulated about Phryne have to do with her beauty, her nudity, and her forwardness. [] Alciphron also crafts a letter that Phryne writes to Praxiteles; in it, Phryne toys with the theological implications of Praxiteles' use of her as a model for Aphrodite, and her statuary appearance at a sanctuary to Eros at Thespiai.

See also[edit]