genus

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See also: ĝenus and -genus

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia enWikipedia en

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin genus (birth, origin, a race, sort, kind) from the root gen- in Latin gignere, Old Latin gegnere (to beget, produce).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

genus (plural genera)

  1. (biology, taxonomy) a rank in the classification of organisms, below family and above species; a taxon at that rank
    All magnolias belong to the genus Magnolia.
    Other species of the genus Bos are often called cattle or wild cattle.
    There are only two genera and species of seadragons.
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page 6
      Müller [] criticized the division of the "Jubuleae" into two families and he cited Jubula as an annectant genus.
  2. A group with common attributes
  3. (topology) A number measuring some aspect of the complexity of any of various manifolds or graphs
  4. (semantics) Within a definition, a broader category of the defined concept.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin genus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡeːnus/, [ˈɡ̊eːnus]

Noun[edit]

genus n (plural indefinite genus or genera)

  1. (biology, taxonomy) genus
  2. (grammar) gender

Synonyms[edit]

  • (taxonomic genus): slægt
  • (grammatical genus): køn

External links[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin genus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

genus n (plural genera)

  1. (botany) a rank in a taxonomic classification, in between family and species.
  2. (botany) a taxon at this rank
  3. (linguistics) gender

Synonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia la

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *genos, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénh₁os (race), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (to produce, beget); compare also gēns, from a related root. Cognates include Ancient Greek γένος (génos, race, stock, kin, kind), Sanskrit जनस् (jánas, race, class of beings).

Noun[edit]

genus n (genitive generis); third declension

  1. birth, origin
  2. kind, type, class
  3. species (of animal or plant), race (of people)
    • 29 bc. Vergil. Georgics, III
      omne adeo genvs in terris hominvmqve ferarvmqve
      et genvs æqvorevm pecvdes pictæqve volvcres
      in fvrias ignemqve rvvnt
      So far does every species on earth of man and beast,
      whether the aquatic species, livestock, or painted-winged,
      collapse into the frenzies and the fire [of sex].
  4. set, group (with common attributes)
  5. (grammar) gender
Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative genus genera
genitive generis generum
dative generī generibus
accusative genus genera
ablative genere generibus
vocative genus genera
Hyponyms[edit]
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Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflection of genū.

Noun[edit]

genūs

  1. genitive singular of genū

Etymology 3[edit]

Inflection of genus

Noun[edit]

genus

  1. accusative singular of genus
  2. vocative singular of genus

Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sv

Noun[edit]

genus n

  1. (grammar) gender (division of nouns and pronouns)
  2. (social) gender, sex (social issues of being man or woman)

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Biological gender is called kön. The Latin word genus is used for grammar and more recently for gender studies.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]