User:Andrew massyn/quotes

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Quotes that I have entered and like.

Apartheid[edit]

1917, General Jan Smuts: Speech at the Savoy Hotel. The superior civilizing race was lost in the quicksands of African blood,.. and it has become axiomatic that it is a dishonourable thing that there shall be any mixture of white and black blood….We have felt that if we are to solve our native question, it is useless to subject (black and white) to the same machinery of legislation. We have found that the ideas which apply to our white civilization do not apply to the natives and to give a political existence on an equal basis does not lead to the best results….The practice is being built up in South Africa of creating parallel institutions and of making the natives run on different but parallel lines to the whites….White and black are different not only in colour, but almost in soul…Instead of mixing up black and white all over the country, we are now trying to keep them as far apart as possible in government, (and) the forms of political government will be such that each will be satisfied and each will develop according to its own proper rights. Economically the native will go on working in the white areas.

During the evening, songs were given by Miss Ada Forrest and Mr. Edward Halland
(sadly removed because it does not contain the word, althouth it is still the best exposition of the term I have seen).

apotheosis[edit]

'Unfortunately, and without any fault or negligence on the part of the management of either company, when Mrs Voss got home, she discovered that the tin, in addition to something more than 150 peas, contained a green caterpillar, the larva of one of the species of hawk moth. This innocent insect, thus deprived of its natural destiny, was in fact entirely harmless, since prior to its entry into the tin, it had been subjected to a cooking process of 20 minutes duration at 250 degrees F, and, had she cared to do so, Mrs Voss could have consumed the caterpillar without injury to herself, and even, perhaps, with benefit. She was not, however, to know this, and with commendable civic zeal, she felt it her duty to report the matter to the local authority, and in consequence, grinding slow, but exceeding small, the machinery of the law was set in inexorable motion. 'Thereafter, the caterpillar achieved a sort of posthumous apotheosis. From local authority to the Dorchester magistrates, from the Dorchester magistrates to a Divisional Court presided over by the Lord Chief Justice of England, from the Lord Chief Justice to the House of Lords, the immolated insect has at length plodded its methodical way to the highest tribunal in the land. It now falls to me to deliver my opinion on its case.' (Per Lord Hailsham in Smedleys Ltd v Breed [1974]2 All ER 21(HL) at 24.)

fratricide[edit]

1936: H A L Fisher: A History of Europe: Edward Arnold Publishers P.376.

"The conversion of Russia to Christianity was effected, it would seem by a monster of cruelty and lust. That Vladimir (980 - 1015) was a fratricide, who maintained 3,500 concubines, has not prevented his canonization as a saint."

hanged, drawn and quartered[edit]

According to official records on 19th October 1685, John Fernley, William Ring and Henry Cornish, were given the following sentence.

"You must, every one of you, be had back to the place from whence you came, and from there, you must be drawn to the place of execution, and there you must severally be hanged by the necks everyone of you till you are almost dead; and then you must be cut down, your entrails must be taken out and burnt before your faces, your several heads to be cut off and your bodies divided into four parts, and these to be disposed at the pleasure of of the King and the Lord have mercy on your souls."

besom[edit]

  1. 1954 "Now, in her iceberg-white, holily laundered crinoline nightgown, under virtuous polar sheets, in her spruced and scoured dust-defying bedroom in trig and trim Bay View, a house for paying guests at the top of the town, Mrs Ogmore-Prichard widow, twice, of Mr Ogmore, linolium, retired, and Mr Prichard, failed bookmaker, who maddened by besoming, swabbing and scrubbing, the voice of the vacuum-cleaner and the fume of polish, ironically swallowed disinfectant..." Dylan Thomas: Under Milk Wood p.13

haemorrhoids[edit]

I hope the worst is behind me". - France's midfielder Florent Malouds reveals he had an operation for haemmorrhoids shortlly after arriving in Germany for the World Cup" Argus 17 June 2006 p.14

horsewhip[edit]

Anthony Trollope 1815 - 1888. The Prime Minister: 'He had told his wife that he would ask Fletcher to give up the borough, and that he would make that request with a horsewhip in his hand....But there were difficulties. A man is not horsewhipped simply because you wish to horsewhip him.'

killer whale[edit]

1851 Of this whale, little is known to the Nantucketer, and nothing at all to the professed naturalist. From what I have seen of him at a distance, I should say that he was about the bigness of a grampus. He is very savage - a sort of Feegee fish. He sometimes takes the great Folio whales by the lip and hangs there like a leech until the mighty brute is worried to death. The killer is never hunted. I have never heard what sort of oil he has. Exception might be taken to the name of this whale, on the grounds of its indistinctness. For we are all killers on land and on sea; Bonaparts and sharks included. Herman Melville: Moby Dick. This ed. 1961 Arnot publishers. p.127.

Mongol[edit]

Mathew Paris Chron. Maj. iv.76ff, Translated from The journey of William Rubruck (Hakluyt Society, 2nd series, no.4; 1900) pp. xv-xvi. They are inhuman and beastly, rather monsters than men, thirsting for and drinking blood, tearing and devouring the flesh of dogs and men, dressed in ox-hides, armed with plates of iron short, stout, thickset, strong, invincible, indefatigable, their backs unprotected, their breasts covered with armour...They have one-edged swords and daggers and spare neither age, nor sex nor condition.

pilum[edit]

1776 Besides a lighter spear, the Roman legionary grasped in his right hand the formidable pilum, a ponderous javelin whose utmost length was about six feet and which was terminated by a massy triangular point of steel of about eighteen inches. This instrument was indeed much inferior to our modern fire-arms; since it was exhausted by a single discharge at the distance of only ten or twelve paces. Yet when it was launched by a skilled and firm hand, there was not any cavalry that durst venture within its reach, or any shield or corslet that could withstand the impetuosity of its weight : The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire : Edward Gibbon. This edition Penguin 2000. p. 21

Roc[edit]

The Arabian Nights Entertainment. Tale 4. Sinbad. The Second Voyage. "By this time the sun was about to set, and all of a sudden the sky became as dark as if it had been covered with a thick cloud. I was much astonished at this sudden darkness, but much more when I found it occasioned by a bird of a monstrous size, that came flying toward me. I remembered that I had often heard mariners speak of a miraculous bird called Roc, and conceived that the great dome which I so much admired must be its egg. In short, the bird alighted, and sat over the egg. As I perceived her coming, I crept to the egg, so that I had before me one of the legs of the bird, which was as big as the trunk of a tree. I tied myself strongly to it with my turban, in hopes that the roc next morning would carry me with her out of this desert island. After having passed the night in this condition, the bird flew away as soon as it was daylight, and carried me so high, that I could not discern the earth;

slake[edit]

Notes for landscape tones. Long sequences of tempera. Light filtered through the essence of lemons. An air full of brick-dust - sweet smelling brick dust and the odour of hot pavements slaked with water. Lawrence Durrell. Justine. Faber & Faber 1961 p.14

splendour[edit]

Rudyard Kipling The Just So Stories; How the Rhinoceros got it's skin:

"Once upon a time on an uninhabited island on the shores of the Red Sea, there lived a Parsee from whose hat the rays of the sun were reflected in more-than-oriental-splendour."

ticket-of-leave[edit]

    • 1893:The prosecutrix was the wife of a ticket-of-leave man, named Daniel Jackson, and she was also separated from her husband, and lived for some time with a man named Clarke, who died on the day before the alleged robbery was committed. Clarke left a will bequeathing all his property to the prosecutrix, who, immediately on his death, possessed herself of sixty pound in money which was in his box, which she rolled up and placed in her bosom. Prosecutrix shortly after missed the money but could not account how it had parted from her, and the warrant for £30, and bank-note for £20, laid in the indictment, was part of the money so lost. The prosecutrix admitted, that both before, at the time, and some time after she missed the money, she was overcome with grief and brandy, but she could not say which of these acted most strongly. R v Smith. [1]

weekend warrior[edit]

Title: Military Public Works Construction. Author(s) United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Armed Services. Subcommittee on Real Estate and Military Construction Publisher U. S. Govt. Print. Page 290: "At Anascostia, the training that is done to naval aviators who are in the Reserve Services, weekend warrior(s) as it were, and they come to Anasconstia to get their refresher training."

yellow & idol[edit]

  • There's a one-eyed yellow idol
  • To the north of Kathmandu;
  • There's a little marble cross below the town;
  • And a brokenhearted woman
  • Tends the grave of 'Mad' Carew,
  • While the yellow god for ever gazes down. J Milton Heyes: The Green eye of the little yellow god [2]