Wiktionary:Feedback: difference between revisions

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The Irish Gaelic word "cochall" means "hood" or "hooded garment". "Cochall an chroí", literally, the hood of the heart, is the term in Irish for the pericardium. "Cochall mo chroí" means the "cochall" or hood of my heart or my pericardium. Rural people, used to slaughtering their own livestock, would be familiar with such internal body parts, but they would not be familiar with the English terminology. It would be natural to warm a hooded garment to make it more comfortable, so the saying "cochall mo chroí a théamh" came across into English first as "to warm the cochall of my heart" As the saying became more widespread among non-Irish speakers, they misinterpreted "cochall" as "cockle" then "cockles". Interestingly, there is another Irish phrase, "caisín an chroí", which also translates "cockles of the heart". "Caisín" means "little twisting/winding", which refers to the internal intricate vessels of the heart.
 
The Irish Gaelic word "cochall" means "hood" or "hooded garment". "Cochall an chroí", literally, the hood of the heart, is the term in Irish for the pericardium. "Cochall mo chroí" means the "cochall" or hood of my heart or my pericardium. Rural people, used to slaughtering their own livestock, would be familiar with such internal body parts, but they would not be familiar with the English terminology. It would be natural to warm a hooded garment to make it more comfortable, so the saying "cochall mo chroí a théamh" came across into English first as "to warm the cochall of my heart" As the saying became more widespread among non-Irish speakers, they misinterpreted "cochall" as "cockle" then "cockles". Interestingly, there is another Irish phrase, "caisín an chroí", which also translates "cockles of the heart". "Caisín" means "little twisting/winding", which refers to the internal intricate vessels of the heart.
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i thought this was a dictionary not a site where you have to submit the definitions you're looking for