ambisextrous

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Blend of ambidextrous and sex.

Adjective[edit]

ambisextrous (comparative more ambisextrous, superlative most ambisextrous)

  1. (humorous, sometimes offensive, of a person) Bisexual.
    She is ambisextrous, so may have a sexual partner of either gender.
  2. Epicene, androgynous.
    • 1968, John Brunner, Stand on Zanzibar, New York: Doubleday, OL 24280464M:
      “Yatakang?” said the purser of the express, an elegant young biv-type sporting ambisextrous shoulder-long bangs.
    • 1984, Stanley Leonard Robbins; Ramzi S. Cotran, Vinay Kumar, Pathologic Basis of Disease[2], edition Third, W. B. Saunders, ISBN 9780721675978, OL 3177899M, page 1154:
      The embryogenesis of such male-directed stromal cells remains a puzzle, and it can be only theorized that it represents masculine differentiation of the mesenchyme derived from the embryonic “ambisextrous” primitive gonads.
    • 2003 May 22, Denis Gill; Niall O'Brien, Paediatric Clinical Examinations Made Easy, Churchill Livingstone, ISBN 9780443073175, OL 10259342M:
      Throughout the text the terms ‘he’, ‘him’, ‘his’, should be taken to be ‘ambisextrous’ and to refer to ‘him’ and ‘her’.
  3. Having both male and female, or masculine and feminine elements.
    • 1920, Ezra Pound, “Genesis, or, The First Book in the Bible”, reprinted in Pavannes and Divagations, New Directions Publishing (1974), ISBN 978-0-8112-0575-7, page 171:
      One searches to see whether the author [of “He created them male and female”, Genesis 5:2] meant to say that man was at the start ambisextrous []
    • 1921 November 19, Richard Matthews Hallet, “The Canyon of the Fools”, The Saturday Evening Post, volume 194, number 2, page 55: 
      “So you think, wonderful woman; but you're so utterly unlike your sisters in that particular. You're ambisextrous, do you know that?”
    • a. 1922, “Adolf Smith” (pseudonym), quoted in Dudley Ward Fay, “Adolf, a Modern Edipus”, in The Psychoanalytic Review, Volume IX Number 3 (July 1922), page 281:
      My signature with either hand is the same. I’m ambidextrous, ambisextrous. I’m intermediate sex.