caveat emptor

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From caveat ("may he beware"), the subjunctive of caveo ("I beware") + emptor ("buyer").

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Phrase[edit]

caveat emptor

  1. Used as a warning to anyone buying something that there might be unforeseen problems or faults with what is bought.
  2. (law) A provision of Roman law which gave the seller of a house the legal right to keep quiet about any defects of a house which he was selling.

Related terms[edit]