congregate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin congregatus, past participle of congregare (to congregate); from con- (with, together) + gregare (to collect into a flock), from grex (flock, herd). See gregarious.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒŋ.ɡɹə.ɡeɪt/

Adjective[edit]

congregate (comparative more congregate, superlative most congregate)

  1. (rare) Collective; assembled; compact.
    • 1605, Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning, Book II, Chapter IX:
      With this reservation, therefore, we proceed to human philosophy or humanity, which hath two parts: the one considereth man segregate or distributively, the other congregate or in society; so as human philosophy is either simple and particular, or conjugate and civil.

Verb[edit]

congregate (third-person singular simple present congregates, present participle congregating, simple past and past participle congregated)

  1. (transitive): To collect into an assembly or assemblage; to assemble; to bring into one place, or into a united body; to gather together; to mass; to compact.
    • Hooker,
      Any multitude of Christian men congregated may be termed by the name of a church.
    • Coleridge,
      Cold congregates all bodies.
    • Milton,
    The great receptacle Of congregated waters he called Seas.
  2. (intransitive): To come together; to assemble; to meet.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

congregate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of congregare
  2. second-person plural imperative of congregare
  3. feminine plural of congregato

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

congregāte

  1. first-person plural present active imperative of congregō