harbinger

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Originally, a person that is sent in advance to provide lodgings. From Middle English herbergeour, from Old French herbergeor ( > French hébergeur, from héberger (to accommodate, put up), from Frankish *heriberga (lodging, inn, literally army shelter), from Proto-Germanic *harjaz (army) + *bergô (protection). Compare German Herberge, Italian albergo, Dutch herberg, English harbour. More at here, borrow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

harbinger (plural harbingers)

  1. A person or thing that foreshadows or foretells the coming of someone or something.
    • Landor
      I knew by these harbingers who were coming.
  2. (obsolete) One who provides lodgings; especially, the officer of the English royal household who formerly preceded the court when travelling, to provide and prepare lodgings.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

harbinger (third-person singular simple present harbingers, present participle harbingering, simple past and past participle harbingered)

  1. (transitive) To announce; to be a harbinger of.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

See also[edit]